stellar wind

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stellar wind

The steady stream of matter ejected from many types of stars, including the Sun (see solar wind). Although the mass loss is small in sunlike stars, it has been found to be very considerable in red giants and in hot luminous ultraviolet stars, particularly in Of stars and Wolf-Rayet stars. This large mass loss could have a substantial effect on the final evolution of the stars into either white dwarfs or into more massive neutron stars (or black holes). In hot stars the stellar winds are thought to be produced by radiation pressure of the intense ultraviolet radiation acting on the atoms in the stars' atmospheres. In red giants with hot coronae and low gravity the winds may simply be the expansion of the coronal gases into space. See also T Tauri wind.

stellar wind

[′stel·ər ′wind]
(astronomy)
The flow of ionized gas from the surface of a star into interstellar space.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eta Carinae's low-energy, or soft, X-rays come from gas at the interface of the colliding stellar winds, where temperatures exceed 70 million degrees Fahrenheit (40 million degrees Celsius).
The low energy X-rays, as previously suggested, was a result of the collision between hot stellar winds going up to 40 million degrees Celsius, but the "hard" X-rays had energies more than 30,000 electron volts, which is much more than what could be explained by the collision of winds.
Some chapter topics include observations of interstellar and circumstellar ice, the galactic plane source populations revealed by AKARI, 3D dynamics of interactions between stellar winds and the interstellar medium, and near-infrared spectroscopy of brown dwarfs with AKARI.
During this whole time eta Car has been shedding material via its ferocious stellar winds, resulting in an opaque cloud of dust in its immediate vicinity.
"Their combined stellar winds (like the solar wind, only stronger) are blowing into this cloud and creating the wave-like shapes that you can see.
"Their combined stellar winds [like the solar wind, only stronger] are blowing into this cloud and creating the wave-like shapes.
The new discoveries suggest that stellar winds drive off much less star mass than researchers used to think they did.
Cassinelli and colleagues at Wisconsin, the University of California at Berkeley, and Oxford University observed the relatively young, hot star Epsilon Canis Majoris in an attempt to uncover the energetic forces that drive stellar winds. Such winds exist on the sun and are responsible for phenomena like the northern lights.
One holds stellar winds responsible for blowing off the envelope, and the other - like in the case of SN 2001ig - lose them due to the actions of a companion in a binary system.
During their lives, massive stars produce copious amounts of ionising radiation and kinetic energy through strong stellar winds. The ionising radiation of massive stars was crucial for the re-brightening of the Universe after the so-called Dark Ages, and their mechanical feedback drives the evolution of galaxies.
Nowhere is this migration more certain than in cases involving hot Jupiters and hot Neptunes: these gas giants would have a hard time forming so close to their stars, because stellar winds would strip their atmospheres away.