stellaria media


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Related to stellaria media: common chickweed, chickweed
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chickweed
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chickweed
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chickweed
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chickweed

chickweed

Found almost everywhere and grows year round, even winter under snow. Most people think it’s an obnoxious weed, but it tastes good and is good for you. Whole plant is edible. Harvest young leafy stem tips, buds and flowers. Cut off and use the top 2 inches, not below that or it all be to fibrous and straw-like. Leaves and stems can be made into a tea, leaves and whitish flowers make a great salad. Chickweed is one of the best bronchial decongestants. Anti-inflammatory properties reduce inflamed lungs, bowels and stomach. Antioxidant, antihistamine, reduces sinus congestion, bronchitis, circulatory problems. Juice is antiseptic. Used to reduce body fat- especially cellulite, remove plaque from arteries, build nerve tissue, regulate thyroid, dissolve cysts and tumors, alkalize the blood, heal ulcers, remove old hard crusty dried mucus from the colon, neutralize toxins, stimulate lymph and glands, laxative properties, kidney issues, rheumatism. A complete B complex. Regulates intestinal flora. High vitamin C; ascorbic-acid, beta-carotene, calcium, magnesium, niacin, potassium, riboflavin, selenium, thiamin, zinc, copper, and Gammalinolenic- acid. Smooth stems to about a foot long, one row of tiny hairs growing in a row on one side of the stem, switching to other side at each pair of opposite, oval pointed leaves. Small white flowers with five petals so deeply notched that they look like ten petals. No milky sap in stem. Grind seeds into powder to add to meals, drinks, porridge and breads. Do not take if pregnant. TOXIC NEIGHBOR- Scarlet Pimpernel (Scarlet pimpernel)- often grows mixed with chickweed. Has square stem and orange or reddish flowers with 5 wide petals. Scarlet pimpernel has smooth stems while Chickweed has some small hairs along one edge and white flowers with what looks like 10 thin petals.
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13 Silene alba 1 1 Silene vulgaris 7 Solanum dulcamara 4 1 Solanum nigrum 1 1 Spergula arvensis 9 Stellaria graminea 3 6 Stellaria media 1 13 Thlaspi arvense 2 3 Urtica dioica 3 1 5 Urtica urens 3 4 Viola arvensis 1 1 MEADOW PLANTS Alchemilla sp.
Four species (Stellaria media, Lonicera japonica, Veronica hederaefolia and Duchesnea indica) exhibited similar patterns of frequency among the nine transects, and were significantly more frequent at the Violets Lock site (Table 4).
Many of these introduced plants have become weeds, including St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), white horehound (Marrubium vulgare), mullein (Verbascum thapsus), chickweed (Stellaria media), nettle (Urtica dioica), shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris), dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) and yellow dock (Rumex crispus) (Lamp 1983).
Every year, as winter begins to wane and spring is reborn, I look forward to seeing a familiar old friend and one of my favorite herbs, Chickweed (Stellaria media).
It's easy to find chickweed (Stellaria media) in large planters on street corners and in gardens.
Stellaria media (Chickweed): Applied externally as a poultice or salve, it has been used to treat wounds, cuts, itching and irritation.
Common chickweed (Stellaria media) is a mild green perfectly suited for salads, and that's how we use it in our kitchen.
Leaves of Stellaria media and Malva neglecta are cooked as mixed vegetable and eaten two or three times to cure constipation.