stem cell

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stem cell

Histology an undifferentiated cell that gives rise to specialized cells, such as blood cells

Stem Cell

 

a cell in the continuously renewing tissues of animals that is capable of developing in different directions, within the limits of tissue differentiation.

stem cell

[′stem ‚sel]
(embryology)
A formative cell.
(histology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the current efforts surrounding stem-cell research fail the latter question.
Advocates of stem-cell research, led by an advocacy group called StemPAC, demanded Dobson apologize.
in a lengthy editorial two days later: "Open the doors wide to stem-cell research" (July 30).
This magazine has repeatedly reported the ongoing development of successful treatments arising from adult stem-cell research. In "Pro-life Stem-cell Therapy" (December 27, 2004), we noted a November 28, 2004 report from the French news agency AFP that declared: "A South Korean woman paralyzed for 20 years is walking again after scientists say they repaired her damaged spinal cord using stem cells from umbilical cord blood." And in "Another Adult Stem-cell Success Story" (January 24, 2005), we related how doctors had used a seven-year-old girl's own adult stem cells to repair 19 square inches of her skull that had been damaged in a fall.
The United States President's Council on Bioethics addressed this issue in a report entitled "Human Cloning and Human Dignity: An Ethical Inquiry." The panel consists of 17 leading scientists and ethicists, seven of whom favour cloning for embryonic stem-cell research. In defence of this position, the best this minority of seven could do is argue that a human embryo has little moral status because it is not the same as a human adult, "any more than a pile of building materials is the same as a house."
The ASCB, which promotes public policies favored by scientists based in companies and universities, favors stem-cell research for similar reasons.
The media focus has been on the supposed benefits to mankind of expanding embryonic stem-cell research and on the supposed harm President Bush's policies have inflicted on this research.
"It is designed to endorse Republican candidates who oppose legal abortion, stem-cell research and other 'life' issues.
In the interests of both morality and health, society should opt for non-embryonic stem-cell research and fund it generously.
"I oppose federal funding for stem-cell research that involves destroying living human embryos," the president pledged on May 18, 2001 in a letter to Robert A.
(NIH) stated that they intended to fund stem-cell research. This news was warmly greeted by many of the scientific community involved in this work.
A father's fight for his son's health becomes a global effort, in this highly recommended book about Proposition 71 and stem-cell research.