ocellus

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ocellus

(pl. ocelli): see eyeeye,
organ of vision and light perception. In humans the eye is of the camera type, with an iris diaphragm and variable focusing, or accommodation. Other types of eye are the simple eye, found in many invertebrates, and the compound eye, found in insects and many other
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ocellus

[ō′sel·əs]
(invertebrate zoology)
A small, simple invertebrate eye composed of photoreceptor cells and pigment cells.
(petrology)
A phenocryst in an ocellar rock.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Prohibition of administering poisonous/ deadly drugs and Medical Oaths of Hippocratic Stemma
The absence of a corneal lens on each stemma was readily apparent when non-sclerotized internal material was removed with 15% KOH.
In 1941, the philologist Sergei Bugoslavskii (1888-1945) published an article describing an edition of the PVL that he had prepared for publication based on the use of a stemma. His article appeared in a collection titled Starinnaia russkaia povest' (The Old Rus' Tale) under the editorship of the literary scholar Nikolai Kallinikovich Gudzii (1888-1965) and was detailed as to specifics, so it was probable Bugoslavskii had indeed prepared such an edition.
La discussione si incentra sulla figura del drago alato senza coda, stemma gentilizio della famiglia di Gregorio XIII.
Moretti hopes that the apparatus criticus will thus be useful in locating other 'testimonia' into the right place within the stemma; moreover, conjectures and variant readings found in previous editions are recorded.
Presumably the family had a stemma. (55) The descent, if correct, is not incompatible with the date of this inscription, by a reckoning of 30 years to a generation.
Other essays include work on the stemma of the Piers Plowman B manuscripts, Byron and Medwin, Edward Young's The Centaur Not Fabulous, the Hinman collator, and Samuel Richardson's anonymous periodical writings.
In a meticulous and masterful introduction of over 120 pages, Cavalcanti and Montanari discuss text-critical aspects of the material (e.g., the coherence of this collection and the stemma) as well as its historical and theological dimensions (e.g., the dating of Easter and the Christology of the sermons).
xi-xcii), which carefully reviews the 19 extant manuscripts (nine of which are complete), analyzes variants, establishes the stemma, and traces the genesis of the work in three distinct phases.
There is a generous introduction, giving Hume's background and motives (it was a History commissioned by the tenth Earl of Angus), an account of all the manuscripts and editions with a stemma, language notes with a glossary, a critique of Hume as historian and stylist, and an index of persons.
A possible stemma of the relationship of the witnesses occurs on page 33*.