stereo effect

stereo effect

[′ster·ē·ō i‚fekt]
(acoustics)
Reproduction of sound in such a manner that the listener receives the sensation that individual sounds are coming from different locations, just as did the original sounds reaching the stereo microphone system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Echo Plus can be paired with another Echo Plus speaker to create a stereo effect. It can also be connected to an Echo Sub to beef up bass output.
As well as producing sound from the bottom speaker when watching video or listening to music, the iPhone 7 also has a speaker at the top of the device, where the earpiece is next to the front-facing camera - so you get a more clearly defined stereo effect.
The Diamond+Bluetooth is an N-class 2.1 speaker system with patented sideways stereo effect with right and left woofer tubes on the sides of the device as well as Neodymium Super Magnet technologies and a Bass Resonant Tube that pumps up the bass with 300% sound boost for vibrant music that fills the party with booming crystal-clear sound.
The stereo effect was as magical as Leleu's remarkable sound on that instrument.
They explained that if the inter-ocular distance is too large, objects in the close foreground, or in the far background, could be excessively separated by the exaggerated stereo effect, causing the human eye or brain to have to work harder than expected to bring the image into focus.
"There will be two sets of timpani (kettledrums), one either side of the stage to give a stereo effect during the chariot race scenes and the sea battle, and we're hiring a big organ ( we'll be making a big noise!"
The positioning of a great phalanx of horns made for a wonderful stereo effect with their opposite numbers.
In particular, stereo effect and overall frequency balance barely varied.
For instance, at the scale at which he was working, a star 200 light-years distant would have to be displaced five pixels for the stereo effect to succeed.
"Some people like to sit in front, for maximum size of picture and stereo effect of the sound, and to avoid distractions from people in front of them.
Unless the viewer's rotation about the line of sight is accounted for, one's head could tilt 180 [degrees] to find an inverse stereo effect, or 90 [degrees] to find no stereo effect at all.