stereoscopy


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Related to stereoscopy: stereoscope, photogrammetry, stereographs

Stereoscopy

The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes, producing a visual experience of the third dimension, that is, a vivid perception of the relative distances of objects in space. In this experience the observer seems to see the space between the objects located at different distances from the eyes.

Stereopsis, or stereoscopic vision, is believed to have an innate origin in the anatomic and physiologic structures of the retinas of the eyes and the visual cortex. It is present in normal binocular vision because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object points in space are slightly different in the two eyes. The stereoscope, with which different pictures can be presented to each eye, demonstrates the fundamental difference between stereoscopic perception of depth and the conception of depth and distance from the monocular view. See Vision

stereoscopy

[‚ster·ē′äs·kə·pē]
(physiology)
The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes in which there is a vivid perception of the distances of objects from the viewer; it is present because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object are slightly different in the two eyes. Also known as stereopsis; stereoscopic vision.

stereoscopy

stereoscopy
The art and science that deals with the use of binocular vision for the observation of a pair of overlapping photographs or other perspective views. It also deals with the methods by which viewing is produced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than simply connect stereoscopy to current cinematic articulations of 3-D, Belisle turns to the works of Eadweard Muybridge and Etienne Jules Marey to show how, taken together, their motion-study experiments can be seen as functioning like a hinge that connects stereoscopy and photography to cinema.
He's also completed his astrophysics PhD in 2007, and is a dedicated animal activist, and is a keen exponent of stereoscopy, an early form of 3D photography.
Away from music, he completed his astrophysics PhD in 2007, more than 30 years after starting it, is a dedicated animal activist, and is a keen exponent of stereoscopy, an early form of 3D photography.
SEM-based stereoscopy claims a vertical resolution down to 25 nm.
For the first time some gallery work showcased Stereoscopy images created by the students viewed with 3D Glasses.
(17) (Lumiere actually re-shot and re-presented this film in stereoscopy to the French Academy of Sciences in 1935.) While research on this tale has revealed a less dramatic story, Stephen Bottomore concludes that, audiences did indeed experience an "anxious or panicky reaction to films of approaching vehicles." (18) Gunning points to Maxim Gorky's description of the film's exhibition in 1896: "It speeds right at you--watch out!
First, there is stereoscopy. This technique uses two cameras, one for each eye, to create to separate 2D images that are then combined in the brain to give the illusion of depth.
Many new technologies were launched with special focus on digital revolution in filmmaking, 3D Stereoscopy, VFX, Definition, 3D Production, live professional sound and light demonstrations.
The 3D magazine, which will come in 60 pages, is setting a trend in the Middle East, which is an achievement in itself to the Filipinos, according to the German-based Stereoscopy.com International, which will review it to monitor its content.
This being Los Angeles, we had Hollywood royalty on display visual effects pioneer Douglas Trumbull (2001: A Space Odyssey, Blade Runner) discussed trends in production and exhibition technologies, with a heavy focus on stereoscopy and high frame rates.
Stereoscopy. Proceedings of Parallel Computing and Visualization Workshops 2005.
The first thing you need to know is that it's really known as Stereoscopy -- that refers to any technique that creates the illusion of depth in an image.