stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
It varies in its accuracy, the extent to which it captures the degree to which the stereotyped group members possess these traits, and the extent to which the set of beliefs is shared by others".
For example, stereotyping in effect becomes more conspicuous when it affects the audience in such a way that when they encounter the stereotyped person, they already have a preconceived notion of them.
deviance from stereotyped gender norms, but also that women on the whole
Women are stereotyped as being "emotional (irrational), weak, nurturing and submissive" (Tyson 85).
One interpretation of these data is that women, especially those in STEM majors, may adopt an avoidance goal to avoid confirming the stereotyped belief that they cannot perform well in science.
The SAT literature suggests that associating a stereotyped domain with one set of characteristics rather than another set can alter people's subsequent actions and behaviors on that task.
The extent to which the strength of the response association states that the female spheres, especially the domestic, appear more stereotyped than the male ones must be taken into consideration, as has been suggested in various different disciplines (Wood & Eagly, 2002).
Behavior confirmation, a specific type of self-fulfilling prophecy where expectations induce people to act in way consistent with those expectations (Snyder, Tanke & Berscheid, 1977), is an external threat, involving a situational threat of being stereotyped (Steele, 1999).
In everyday speech, a stereotype is a caricature of group characteristics, a perception which exaggerates the differences between the stereotyped group and others.
The vast majority of New Zealanders are also well aware, we maintain, of the core characteristics (or stereotyped content) used to repeatedly describe and depict these visible ethnic groups within NZ society.
But, there are theoretical reasons to believe stereotypes, such as those regarding men's lack of nurturance, may sometimes lead people to evaluate stereotyped targets more positively than they evaluate equivalent non-stereotyped targets (Biernat, 2003; Burgoon, 1986; Jussim, Coleman, & Lerch, 1987; Kahneman & Miller, 1986).
CEDAW specifically prohibits gender discrimination and Article 5(a) requires that states "modify social and cultural patterns of conduct with a view to the elimination of prejudices and customary and all other practices which are based on the idea of the inferiority or the superiority of either of the sexes or on stereotyped roles for men and women." The UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (Women's Committee) has the authority and responsibility to monitor and enforce the implementation of CEDAW.