stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the remainder, there were somewhat more respondents, particularly women, who stereotyped men as better on the various dimensions of service quality than respondents who stereotyped women as better.
And even if this generalization is plausible, the dispositive question is not whether government interests rest on plausible assumptions, but whether they rest on stereotyped ones.
However, few have considered more than one factor simultaneously to reveal the joint effect they have on performance in a stereotyped domain.
People seem motivated to align themselves with positively stereotyped groups and, as a byproduct, can eliminate the worry, stress and cognitive depletion brought about by negative performance stereotypes, increasing actual performance," he added.
The subversion of stereotypes necessarily deploys these stereotypes, for "to judge the stereotyped image on the basis of a prior political normativity is to dismiss it, not to displace it, which is only possible by engaging with its effectivity" (Bhabha 67).
For example, "nurse" is always stereotyped as a woman's job in China; thus, response times for nurse-women will be faster among Chinese respondents.
Accordingly low users are predicted to lessen their stereotype-based beliefs in response to the presentation of stereotype-disconfirming information about a stereotyped group.
Talk about stereotyping - we're being stereotyped as insensitive.
Higher subscale scores indicate a more stereotyped view, either positive or negative, of aging.
For instance, professors are often stereotyped as competent people, and athletes are regarded as having abundant power.
The research shows that even white Americans, a historically nonstigmatized group, engage in social deviance when they feel they are being stereotyped negatively.
In most cases, the debate shifts to whether the viewers of these comedy shows laugh at the stereotyped group or the stereotyped group laugh alongside (Kerrigan, 2011; Oring, 2011).