stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brian, 70, used to work as a stereotyper in the Western Mail & Echo before finishing in the 1980s.
He later became an apprentice at the Tudor Works in Cardiff, and then transferred to the Western Mail & Echo foundry in Westgate Street, where he worked as a stereotyper in the days of hot metal printing.
I was a stereotyper in the foundry and used to make the platelets on the printing press,' he said.
I decided to do it because, although there had been several guides about Cardiff's pubs, nobody had ever really done a book on it before,' said Brian, who spent 28 years as a stereotyper at the Western Mail and Echo during his working life.
The stereotypers become resistant to counter-evidence.
Animal stereotypers should try caring for the "ugly" animals to see that these animals are fun and beautiful--on the inside.
My recall comes from an association of more than 20 years, and turnovers that brought editorial help, business people, office personnel, advertising sales, circulation and maybe 40 skilled printers - linotype operators, compositors, engravers, job printers, pressmen, stereotypers and proofreaders - into frequent dialogue.
During the strike the closure of the Free Press began on 16 May with the walkout by all of its Webb pressmen and stereotypers.
In addition, women may be stereotyped in ways that the stereotypers do not see as intrinsically harmful; this is also known as "benevolent stereotyping.
238) However, this research also suggests that the effects of negative stereotypes can be neutralized, at least in the individual case, when stereotypers are confronted with information about an individual that contradicts their negative stereotypes.