stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
Schemer (2012) conducted a panel study to probe the impact of the stereotypic and nationalist slant in Swiss TV news reporting, and Dixon (2008) examined racial stereotypes in U.S.
In captivity these behaviors are replaced by anomalous ones or may be stereotypic like pacing etc.
Stereotypic representation is visible here, as no girl can be represented as mighty, huge or gigantic, especially in the tradition saturated Indian culture where women are treated as 'second sex'.
The Impact of Mothers' Gender-Role Stereotypic Beliefs On Mothers' and Children's Ability Perceptions.
Percentages of sessions in which stereotypic behavior occurred during baseline, VT exposure, and test conditions.
Other studies discussed that areas with fences, through which felids can see conspecifics, other animals, or humans, were associated with increased stereotypic behavior [33, 34].
* Are the level of adolescent storm and stress and the level of the teachers' stereotypic belief about the sources of these behaviors related in any meaningful way?
Despite the paucity of data, our results combined with those of Sellinger and Ha (2005), which also used an individual-based approach, suggest that the effect of public exposure on jaguars' stereotypic pacing may operate on an individual-basis, being ultimately determined by the sensitivity of the enclosure's occupant to one or more environmental stimuli.
While both may occur more during anxiety, excitement, or fatigue, stereotypic movements, unlike tics, also are common when the child is engrossed.
A spokesman for charity Animal Defenders International, said: "This abnormal, repetitive, 'stereotypic' behaviour is not seen in the wild.
In Chapter 6, the authors explore themes of the local/cultural by pointing to the ways in which gaming is a global phenomenon, not simply confined to stereotypic demographics.
The rating for cocaine-induced stereotypic behavior was based on a modification (24) of the Creese and Iversen scale (25) (see Table 1).