sternocleidomastoid


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sternocleidomastoid

[¦stər·nō¦klīd·ə′ma‚stȯid]
(anatomy)
A muscle of the neck that flexes the head; origin is the manubrium of the sternum and clavicle, and insertion is the mastoid process.
References in periodicals archive ?
the two heads of sternocleidomastoid can be difficult, especially in obese and short necked patients, whereas posterior approach requires identification of only the bulk of sternocleidomastoid muscle.
8x5 cm, well defined mass located anterior to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle and two other smaller lesions approximately 1 cm deeper.
Parathyroid glands were transplanted in the sternocleidomastoid muscle once we found that the blood supply to the glands was compromised.
Typically arising from the transverse process of C3 to C5, the levator claviculae courses inferiorly, lateral to the scalene and levator scapulae muscles, medial and posterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle and usually inserting on the clavicle.
An incision lengthed about 5-8 cm was made two fingerbreadths from the suprasternal notch to cut open the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and to separate loose connective tissues of bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles and infrahyoid muscles until the upper and lower planes of side thyroid lobes.
A 8-mm Dacron interposition graft was sutured in place, the shunt was removed, and the detached sternocleidomastoid muscle was sutured (figure 2).
UPPER CROSSED SYNDROME MUSCULATURE Overly facilitated Overly inhibited ("tight") muscles ("weak") muscles Pectoralis major Rhomboids Pectoralis minor Middle and lower trapezius Subclavius Serratus anterior Upper trapezius Longus colli and capitis (deep neck flexors) Levator scapulae Infraspinatus and teres minor Sternocleidomastoid Thoracic paraspinals (SCM) Suboccipital group Table 2.
The lesion is situated posterolateral to right sternocleidomastoid muscle, lateral to right carotid and jugular vessel and right scalene muscle anterior to right trapezius muscle and posterosuperior to clavicle and subclavian vessel suggestive of possible lymphangioma.
For example, a trigger point in a neck muscle such as the sternocleidomastoid can refer to the temporalis muscle, located on the side of the skull, and cause a tension headache.
A 1 cmx 1 cm papular lesion noted to the left side of the neck along the sternocleidomastoid muscle with clear discharge.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is an important landmark in the neck which divides it into an anterior and a posterior triangle.
Surgical exploration of the neck revealed a large infected hematoma in and around the sternocleidomastoid muscle, which was debrided and a drain was left in place (Fig.

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