sternocleidomastoid

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sternocleidomastoid

[¦stər·nō¦klīd·ə′ma‚stȯid]
(anatomy)
A muscle of the neck that flexes the head; origin is the manubrium of the sternum and clavicle, and insertion is the mastoid process.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tract then courses superiorly dorsal to the common carotid artery, loops around the hypoglossal nerve and extends medially to the sternocleidomastoid muscle.
Respondents were asked to list (in their opinion) the most effective form of intervention for the management of the shortened sternocleidomastoid muscle in infants with CMT (Table 6).
Hollinshead (2) described variations of the external jugular vein (1): It runs vertically downwards across the superficial surface of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (very rarely deep into it).
To relieve the pain, the NMT was applied to stretch the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles.
The accessory nerve was stimulated with a bipolar surface stimulator 1-2 cm posterior to the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, mid-way between the mastoid process and the suprasternal notch.
After marking the presumed puncture site at the junction of the two heads of sternocleidomastoid muscle, the probe was applied perpendicular to the skin without pressure (to prevent right IJV compression and deformation).
Third BCCs are posterior to the common or internal carotid artery and the sternocleidomastoid muscle, between the hypoglossal nerve below and the glossopharyngeal nerve above.
A friend without any medical training held the device at the area of greatest discomfort, described as being below the angle of the jaw and over the sternocleidomastoid muscle.
A 79-year-old woman, who had undergone Mohs excision of a left cheek cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma 1 month previously, presented with a growing, tender lump over the left sternocleidomastoid muscle with associated left auricular pain.
The patient's head is turned to the side opposite the surgery and the sternocleidomastoid muscle identified by asking the patient to lift his or her head.
Scalene muscle uptake is often seen after neck dissection, where the sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed.

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