stibnite

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stibnite

(stĭb`nīt), antimony sulfide, Sb2S3, a mineral, silvery gray in color, with a metallic luster. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system. Found in many parts of the world, it is the most important ore of antimony. It is commonly deposited by alkaline waters and occurs in association with quartz, calcite, sulfides of the base metals, arsenic, gold, and silver. Known in ancient times, stibnite was used in powdered form by women to darken their eyebrows and eyelashes. Antimony is used in alloys for type metal, storage batteries, pewter, babbitt, and antifriction metal for bearings. Its compounds find use in explosives, matches, and fireworks, in vulcanizing rubber, and in medicine as an emetic.
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stibnite

[′stib‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Until the beginning of the industrial age in China, antimony in the form of stibnite was used only for pharmaceutical purposes and in making fireworks, but with the increasing influence of Europeans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the significance of all metals changed fundamentally.
When, because of the considerable increase in small-mining activity, the production of stibnite and of metallic antimony increased too rapidly, the State was motivated to limit production in order to stabilize prices.
A few of the antimony deposits (such as those at Qinglong, Zhenxu and Woxi) are significant not only for their stibnite but also for the appreciable gold content of their ores.
Most of the stibnite occurrences of the world are found in the circum-Pacific, Mediterranean and Central Asia-Tianshan tectonic belts.
Most of the important Chinese stibnite deposits are found in sedimentary carbonate rocks of Devonian age; less important deposits occur in low-grade metamorphic rocks.
He collected 15 kilograms of ore for testing in Changsha, the capital of Hunan, where it was determined to be stibnite. This, however, did not prevent the misleading name Xikuangshan ("tin ore mountain") from continuing to be used for the most important antimony deposit in the world.
As of today the government has provided Xikuangshan with two ore-preparation facilities and three smelters for the four discrete stibnite orebodies, which are called Feishuiyan, Tongjiayuan, Laokuangshan and Wuhua.
In the course of tectonic events the antimony of the calcareous rocks was mobilized, to be deposited as stibnite in pre-existing fissures and karstic cavities.
Jamesonite has been found in specimens that megascopically appear similar to the below-mentioned stibnite. Any specimens with bright sprays of acicular crystals should be examined closely to determine whether they are jamesonite or stibnite.
Nice specimens of stibnite were produced around 1984.
Pink manganoan calcite has been visually identified as fine-grained pink coatings on stibnite and other sulfides from the Caudalosa mines.
Stibnite occurs as needle-like crystals in fan-shaped sprays on milky quartz crystals.