tie bar

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tie bar

[′tī ‚bär]
(civil engineering)
A bar used as a tie rod.
A rod connecting two switch rails on a railway to hold them to gage.
(geology)

tie bar

1. A flat bar used as a tie or a tie rod.
2. A deformed bar, embedded in a concrete construction at a joint and designed to hold abutting edges together; not designed for direct-load transfer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each map layer can be geocoded with its own unique color-coded stickpin or icon available from a list of several hundred choices.
They are happy until they decide to move to the city, where Joe quickly assimilates himself into metropolitan culture, as indicated by his job selling cosmetics and the ruby red stickpin that he wears.
So he writes: "The newscasts are dust in vapors, and a map / where stickpins mark the travels of anchormen.
A huge map behind him is quilled with green and black stickpins showing (respectively) project sites and the main camps.
A world map filled with stickpins extends across one wall, along with the question, "Where in the world are you from?
The industry has exchanged the ballerina carriage of the sparrow-like Shalom Harlow in the 1990s, for emotionless stickpins.
A: A quick check of the Internet revealed numerous Beatles items being offered, including sheet music in the $25-$40 range; a Yellow Submarine ballpoint pen, $30; an assortment of stickpins for about $5 each; and a large "I Love the Beatles" pennant sold during their American tour, $300.
The symbolic and concrete evidence of these new patterns of consumption were the diamond-studded stickpins, gold pocketwatches, and hard cash pedestrians conspicuously paraded while traversing the streets.
Morrison painstakingly describes the privilege of those with diamond stickpins, fine cigars and monogrammed silver, pointedly contrasting it with a world in which a child's bedroom is a luxury.
We can always back up with manual maps, and stickpins, and stuff like that," Maj.
The moneymen, gimlet-eyed, with peremptory chests, let their suits, cufflinks and stickpins, their oxblood shoes and railroad men's timepieces, speak for them.