stick

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stick

1. a small thin branch of a tree
2. 
a. any long thin piece of wood
b. such a piece of wood having a characteristic shape for a special purpose
c. a baton, wand, staff, or rod
4. Informal the lever used to change gear in a motor vehicle
5. Nautical a mast or yard
6. Informal a rural area considered remote or backward (esp in the phrase in the sticks)
7. W and NW Canadian informal the wooded interior part of the country

stick

[stik]
(engineering)
A rigid bar hinged to the boom of a dipper or pull shovel and fastened to the bucket.
A long slender tool bonded with an abrasive for honing or sharpening tools and for dressing of wheels.
(ordnance)
A succession of missiles fired or released separately at predetermined intervals from a single aircraft.

stick

1. Any long slender piece of wood.
2. A shaped piece of wood, as a stake.

stick

i. The control column of the aircraft for control of its trajectory. See control column.
ii. The number of parachutists who jump from one aperture of an aircraft during one run over a dropping zone (DZ).
iii. The number of bombs or missiles fired or released successively but separately at a predetermined interval from a single aircraft (e.g., a stick of four bombs).
iv. A series of rounds fired by an aircraft's gun in one burst.

stick

(1) See USB stick, Sony Memory Stick, streaming stick and selfie.

(2) Slang for memory module. RAM chips for personal computers are typically mounted on a thin, long printed circuit board (see memory module). A "stick of memory" is not the same as a Sony Memory Stick, which is a flash-based storage module for digital cameras (see Sony Memory Stick).


Two Sticks of Memory
Memory modules are typically housed on printed circuit boards such as these.
References in classic literature ?
"Me give 'm five stick," the six-quart steward bargained.
"You'd better stick by the sled," his partner protested.
But who shall tell the joy of the next morning, when the church bells were ringing a merry peal, and old Benjy appeared in the servants' hall, resplendent in a long blue coat and brass buttons, and a pair of old yellow buckskins and top-boots which he had cleaned for and inherited from Tom's grandfather, a stout thorn stick in his hand, and a nosegay of pinks and lavender in his buttonhole, and led away Tom in his best clothes, and two new shillings in his breeches-pockets?
And he left five years ago--the date is on the stick. So your grave, middle-aged family practitioner vanishes into thin air, my dear Watson, and there emerges a young fellow under thirty, amiable, unambitious, absent-minded, and the possessor of a favourite dog, which I should describe roughly as being larger than a terrier and smaller than a mastiff."
The debtor took his stick again, and bowing his head left the court.
I looked for a stick with which to jab back, but found only the end of a branch, an inch through and a foot long.
Following the memorandum as our guide, we next laid my stick in the necessary direction, as neatly as we could, on the uneven surface of the rocks.
He struck his stick on the stone pavement of the cell, and called out, --
"Take the stick" were the first words she said to me.
"And perhaps you can help us to the man." And he briefly narrated what the maid had seen, and showed the broken stick.
So he flourished his own stick and planted himself in the traveler's path.
Of late they had quit attacking, or even showing themselves; for every time they had done so in the past the little stick had roared out its terrible message of death to some member of the tribe.