stiffness matrix

stiffness matrix

[′stif·nəs ‚mā·triks]
(mechanics)
A matrixKused to express the potential energy V of a mechanical system during small displacements from an equilibrium position, by means of the equation V = ½q T Kq, whereqis the vector whose components are the generalized components of the system with respect to time andq T is the transpose ofq. Also known as stability matrix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Q] is a reduced stiffness matrix obtained by the rotation of the original stiffness matrix Q:
In general, a cohesive element can be differentiated to a continuum element by a reduced stiffness matrix based on reduced sectional stresses, Figure 2.
The stiffness matrix of orthotropic composite materials is usually written as 3*3 matrix in the following:
r] are the mass matrix, stiffness matrix, and exciting force vector based on generalized coordinate [x.
As a continuum material model, the homogenization between the resin matrix and the woven fabric fibers is performed when overall stiffness matrix of each element is assembled.
where u is the displacement vector, M is the mass matrix, C is the damping matrix which includes the friction effect, K is the stiffness matrix, and Q is the external load.
Having known mode shape matrix and stiffness matrix the MSE values is evaluated.
The element stiffness matrix is integrated analytically with the advantage of fast stiffness computation.
Since the in-plane rotational degrees of freedom are not included, the null values for the in-plane rotational degrees of freedom will lead to singularity in structure stiffness matrix if all the elements are coplanar.
The SPF/SPS biocomposite consists of low stiffness matrix and high stiffness fibres, thus by increasing the weight percentage of fibres increases the stiffness of the biocomposites.
The stiffness matrix depending onto the object displacement the solution obtained using the finite element method (FEM), differs from the real value, and in some cases may even extend beyond the task defining domain (Fig.