electrode

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electrode,

terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit. In most familiar circuits current is carried by metallic conductors, but in some circuits the current passes for some distance through a nonmetallic conductor. For example, in electrolysiselectrolysis
, passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process. The Electrolytic Process

The electrolytic process requires that an electrolyte, an ionized solution or molten metallic salt, complete an
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 current passes through a liquid electrolyte; in a fluorescent lamp current passes through a gas. An electrode is usually in the form of a wire, rod, or plate. It may be made of a metal, e.g., copper, lead, platinum, silver, or zinc, or of a nonmetal, commonly carbon. The electrode through which current passes from the metallic to the nonmetallic conductor is called the anode, and that through which current passes from the nonmetallic to the metallic conductor, the cathode. (Electron flow is in a direction opposite that of conventionally defined current.) In most familiar electric devices, current flows from the terminal at higher electric potential (the positive electrode) to the terminal at lower electric potential (the negative electrode); therefore, the anode is usually the positive electrode and the cathode the negative electrode. In some electric devices, e.g., an electric battery, nonelectric energy is converted to electric energy, causing current to flow within the device from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, so that the anode is the negative electrode and the cathode is the positive electrode.

Electrode

 

a structural component of an electronic, ion, or electrical engineering device or production apparatus. It consists of a conductor with a specific shape, which connects a section of an electric circuit in contact with a working medium—a vacuum (in the practical sense), gas, semiconductor, or liquid—to the remainder of the circuit (which is formed by conductors).

The electrodes of electronic devices (electron tubes, electronbeam instruments, semiconductor devices, and so on) are usually in the form of a plate, grid, cylinder, or the like. They have a wide variety of functions. For example, as cathodes and photocathodes, they act as sources of electrons; as grids (control, shield, and suppressor types) and the electrodes of electron guns, they are used to create within a device electric fields that control the motion of electrons and ions in the working medium; as anodes (plates), they collect electrons.


Electrode

 

in electrochemistry, a metal, oxide, or other electrical conductor in contact with an ionic conductor, such as an electrolytic solution or a fused electrolyte. The most important characteristic of electrodes is the electrode potential established at the electrode-electrolyte boundary. Depending on use, electrodes may be classified as reference, indicator, and other types. Systems of two different electrodes can be used as chemical sources of current; when direct current passes through such systems, they act as electrolytic cells.

electrode

[i′lek‚trōd]
(electricity)
An electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
One of the terminals used in dielectric heating or diathermy for applying the high-frequency electric field to the material being heated.

electrode

1. In arc welding, the component in a welding circuit through which an electric current is conducted between the electrode holder and the arc.
2.In resistance welding, the component through which the electric current in the welding machine passes (usually accompanied by pressure) directly to the work.

electrode

1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes

electrode

A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of facial nerve was transected using Meyer neurotome about 4 cm distal to its emergence from the parotid gland, the site of transition being at the mid point of the exposed segment and equidistant from the stimulating electrodes. The cut ends of the nerve were brought into apposition and repaired using 10/0 polyamide interrupted epineural tension free sutures (Ethilon).
Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that there were no significant differences in test M-waves across the five time periods (p > 0.05) demonstrating that there was no movement of the stimulating electrode resulting from the repeated WAnTs.
To accomplish this, dopamine release is electrically evoked with a stimulating electrode in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area or the medial forebrain bundle.
Apply the recording electrodes to both sides; apply the ground and stimulating electrodes to the left side.
With the help of stimulating electrodes supramaximal stimulation was given at two different sites (distal & proximal) to obtain compound motor action potential (CMAP) in motor study while single distal stimulation of 30-35 millivolt was given to obtain sensory nerve action potential (SNAP).
A CI operates as an integrated system that includes one or more microphone inputs, a software-controlled digital signal processor, a transcutaneous link, and an intracochlear stimulating electrode array.
A team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and the University of Louisville have used a stimulating electrode array to assist a paralyzed man to stand, step on a treadmill with assistance, and, over time, to regain voluntary movements of his limbs.
The methods employed included stimulation of the thoracic spinal cord either by insertion of a concentric bipolar stimulating electrode or via two monopolar stimulating electrodes located several centimeters distant from each other along the longitudinal axis of the cord.
4 - Liner inactive stimulating electrode and the defibrillation
178 361 Bipolar Stimulating Electrode felt ped type technomed
In a second series of experiments using anaesthetised monkeys, we will place stimulating electrodes in the motor and pre-motor areas of the cortex, and measure cell responses in the brainstem and spinal cord following cortical stimulation.
Three different types of stimulating electrodes were used for both extradiaphragmatic muscle groups.