stimulator

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stimulator

[′stim·yə‚lād·ər]
(medicine)
A neurosurgical device that supplies a controlled alternating-current voltage to two electrodes that are applied to a patient.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PHARMA-January 24, 2019-Ironwood Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1 Trial of IW-6463, the First CNS-penetrant sGC Stimulator to Enter Clinical Trials
A vagus nerve stimulator is surgically implanted under the skin in the neck or chest.
The gammaCore device is an external vagal nerve stimulator already approved in Canada and Europe for the treatment of primary headache disorders.
Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE:BSX) reported on Friday the limited launch of the Precision Spectra Spinal Cord Stimulator (SCS) System upon the US Food and Drug Administration's approval.
Patients with vagus nerve stimulators should avoid strong magnets and may not undergo MRI imaging unless unless a special head coil is used and the pacemaker is turned off.
The Stimpod NMS450 is the only nerve stimulator featuring programmable repeat timers that allow the anesthetist to set up the unit for continuous monitoring.
"Spinal Cord Stimulators can be life changing as they ease chronic pain by up to 50% and, in some cases, it works almost immediately.
Spinal cord stimulators first emerged long ago as a clinical option after researchers began to study how the nervous system itself amplifies pain symptoms.
Modern spinal cord stimulators are programmable so that once implanted, the signal can be adjusted for optimal pain relief.
Serious injuries or deaths can occur in patients with implanted neurologic stimulators when they undergo MRI procedures, according to a public health notification posted on the Food and Drug Administration's Web site.
This is a world first because Mrs Read has two stimulators in her upper arm and three in her forearm
The FDA also issued a warning for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests for people with implanted neurological stimulators. The warning is based on reports of serious injury, such as irreversible neurological impairment, and coma.