stinging cell


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stinging cell

[′stiŋ·iŋ ‚sel]
(invertebrate zoology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They say that mixing stinging cells from sea anemones into skin cream could be a novel approach to painlessly inject drugs into the patients.
For jellyfish stings, pour lots of vinegar over the area to incapacitate the stinging cells. If you don't have any vinegar, pour over plenty of sea water.
Humans who come into contact with its stinging cells may suffer severe allergic reactions, including burning, edema, convulsions, disturbed respiration, psychological disorders, etc.
It is harmless though, as its stinging cells cannot penetrate human skin.
Washington, Mar 5 ( ANI ): Researchers have shed light on how stinging cells of fresh water polyps called hydra allow them to react to light even in the absence of eyes.
All that is needed is a jellyfish tentacle, dead or alive, with thousands of its stinging cells (i.e.
He said: "They certainly have a very nasty sting, and if anyone is unfortunate enough to be stung, the advice is to use apiece of stick to scrape away any stinging cells left by the creature, and then apply ice."
The numbness comes from special stinging cells. Jellyfish use these stinging cells to stun their dinner or defend against attackers.
There has been an influx of Lion's Mane jellyfish, which are up to three metres long and covered with stinging cells that can produce blisters, irritation, and muscular cramp.