stonework


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stonework,

term applied to various types of work—that of the lapidary who shapes, cuts, and polishes gemstones or engraves them for seals and ornaments; of the jeweler or artisan who mounts or encrusts them in gold, silver, or other metal; of the stonemason who executes the plan of architect or engineer for wall, pier, vault, bridge, or dam; of the carver who chisels bas-relief, intaglio, or freestanding figure, using a pointing machine for accuracy; and of the printer at his imposing stone. The term stonework is most frequently used to refer to the craft of masonry, as old as civilization and still widely used. Of Roman masonry buildings, some aqueducts, arches, basilicas, and baths still remain. Masonry is classified according to finish, rubble being of rough-quarried or field stone and ashlar of dressed stone. It may be laid without mortar (and is then called dry, or Cyclopean) or with mortar to bind the stones closely together, the outside finish of such joints being called pointing. Stonemasonry may be of hard materials, such as granite, bluestone, or marble, requiring full finish before laying, or of softer varieties, such as brownstone, laid with rough exterior, the decoration being carved afterward. The pyramids (see pyramidpyramid.
The true pyramid exists only in Egypt and Sudan, though the term has also been applied to similar structures in other countries. Egyptian pyramids are square in plan and their triangular sides, which directly face the points of the compass, slope upwards at
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) and the sphinxsphinx
, mythical beast of ancient Egypt, frequently symbolizing the pharaoh as an incarnation of the sun god Ra. The sphinx was represented in sculpture usually in a recumbent position with the head of a man and the body of a lion, although some were constructed with rams'
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 of Egypt are among the world's greatest masterpieces of stonework.
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stonework

[′stōn‚wərk]
(civil engineering)
A structure or the part of a structure built of stone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stonework

1. Masonry construction in stone.
2. Preparation or setting of stone for building or paving.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The pigeon poo is highly corrosive and damages stonework beyond repair.
She said the larch, which would be sourced from Scotland, would "weather" within about 12 months to an attractive silver-grey colour and would be an improvement on the existing exposed patched-up stonework, adding: "The stone columns aren't even straight."
The presentation will be held at the Stoneworks Wholesaling, Inc., tile warehouse at:
Its stonework has vegetation growing out of it and there is a real danger of it cracking and falling.
Suskind based on Stonework. It is called "Stonework Inspires Creativity.'' The foundation is inviting educators from around the world to get involved with teaching through natural resources and report back their experiences.
"Country Durham is rich in this kind of stonework and we've got pieces dating back a thousand years.
A large stonework sitting area could soon be installed at Preston Park, in Eaglescliffe.
APPLY ONCE A YEAR TO HELP KEEP STONEWORK LOOKING LIKE NEW
At the upcoming AIA 2009 National Convention and Design Exposition, at booth #5277, in San Francisco, New World Stoneworks (http://www.newworldstoneworks.com) will preview its new stonework design software plug-in that enables architects to design and render the exact stone pattern for a project.
has been recongized for it work on the North Fork Bank branch in Long Beach, NY, whose interior glows with bright southwestern colors and decorative stonework.
THE discovery of loose stonework on the facade of the Grade II* listed Chester train station has caused work on a new lighting system to be suspended.
It was rebuilt three years ago as a Centre for Reconciliation and Peace, using much of the original stonework. The building project was financed through a public appeal, with major contributions from institutions in the City, which is London's business district.