stony meteorite


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stony meteorite

(stone) A type of meteorite that consists of silicate minerals generally with some nickel-iron. The two main subgroups are termed chondrites and achondrites, depending on the presence or absence of chondrules. The great majority (about 95%) of meteorites seen to fall to Earth are stony meteorites, and most of these are chondrites.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

stony meteorite

[′stō·nē ′mēd·ē·ə‚rīt]
(geology)
Any meteorite composed principally of silicate minerals, especially olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase. Also known as aerolite; asiderite; meteoric stone; meteorolite; stone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Explain that the "A" group represents stony meteorites. The "B" group represents stony-iron meteorites, and the "C" group represents iron meteorites.
What we think we know is that the S-type asteroids are the source of the ordinary chondrites, which are the most common stony meteorites that fall on Earth.
Most meteorites are stony and of the stony meteorites, almost all (90 percent) are what are called ordinary chondrites.
New evidence from old rocks suggests that many of the precious metals mined today were delivered to the planet by stony meteorites called chondrites in a bombardment that lasted for hundreds of millions of years.
"The stony meteorites were identified on the basis of their metallic iron content.
Collected fragments are ordinary chondrites, stony meteorites that make up 85% of all meteorites recovered.
Small, stony meteorites typically break up high in the atmosphere (SN: 7/19/03, p.
On the red planet, iron meteorites are more common than stony meteorites, probably because they are better at resisting erosion.
The majority of stony meteorites are chondrites, so named because they contain chondrules--spherical grains of silicate materials unlike anything found on Earth.
Ground-based observations indicate that Vesta represents the only known parent of a class of stony meteorites called basaltic achondrites.
Initial tests revealed that the large rock is an ordinary chondrite - stony meteorites that are commonly found in Earth.
The relative abundance of certain long-lived radioactive isotopes in stony meteorites suggests that the galaxy ranges in age from 9 to 15 billion years.