Stand

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stand

1. a stall, booth, or counter from which goods may be sold
2. an exhibition area in a trade fair
3. Cricket an extended period at the wicket by two batsmen
4. a growth of plants in a particular area, esp trees in a forest or a crop in a field
5. a stop made by a touring theatrical company, pop group, etc., to give a performance (esp in the phrase one-night stand)
6. (of a gun dog) the act of pointing at game
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Stand

 

a section of forest, natural or artificial in origin, that includes trees, shrubs, and various forest plants. There are various types of stands, consisting of groups of trees and other forest components having features characteristic of the given section (origin, kinds of trees, form, density, age, forest type, quality).


Stand

 

an inclined support on which music is placed. Stands in front of musicians who play the same part in the orchestra, for example, the first violins, are designated by consecutive numbers (first stand, second stand, third stand, and so on). The concertmaster and his assistant sit behind the first stand.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stand

[stand]
(ecology)
A group of plants, distinguishable from adjacent vegetation, which is generally uniform in species composition, age, and condition.
(forestry)
The amount of standing timber per unit area; usually expressed in terms of volume.
(metallurgy)
A set of rolls used in a metal-rolling process.
(oceanography)
The interval at high or low water when there is no appreciable change in the height of the tide. Also known as tidal stand.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
He sat; and in th' assembly next upstood NISROC, of Principalities the prime; As one he stood escap't from cruel fight, Sore toild, his riv'n Armes to havoc hewn, And cloudie in aspect thus answering spake.
Forthwith from Councel to the work they flew, None arguing stood, innumerable hands Were ready, in a moment up they turnd Wide the Celestial soile, and saw beneath Th' originals of Nature in thir crude Conception; Sulphurous and Nitrous Foame They found, they mingl'd, and with suttle Art, Concocted and adusted they reduc'd To blackest grain, and into store conveyd: Part hidd'n veins diggd up (nor hath this Earth Entrails unlike) of Mineral and Stone, Whereof to found thir Engins and thir Balls Of missive ruin; part incentive reed Provide, pernicious with one touch to fire.
All the time that he gazed upward to the zenith, he was, nevertheless, perfectly aware that little Pearl was hinting her finger towards old Roger Chillingworth, who stood at no great distance from the scaffold.
cranky!" sounded from all the furniture; there was so much of it, that each article stood in the other's way, to get a look at the little boy.
So we stood on one side, and a second party of the Isanusi women began their rites.
Then the Sheriff stepped down from the raised seat and came to where the archers stood, while all doffed their caps that saw him coming.
Everyone stood arrested by the sudden stir of battle, near us and yet invisible to us.
Had he stood in peril of a less horrible sentence--had there been a chance of any one of its savage details being spared--by just so much would he have lost in his fascination.
That purpose I hold to have justified any ingratitude that I may seem now to have displayed towards the man who had undoubtedly stood between death and me.
On the sidewalk at the side of Winney's Dry Goods Store where there was a high board fence covered with circus pictures, he stopped whistling and stood perfectly still in the darkness, attentive, listening as though for a voice calling his name.
He stood by all the time I was eating, stroking me and talking to the man.
What was Oliver's horror and alarm as he stood a few paces off, looking on with his eyelids as wide open as they would possibly go, to see the Dodger plunge his hand into the old gentleman's pocket, and draw from thence a handkerchief!