stop bit

stop bit

In serial communications, where each bit of the message is transmitted in sequence, stop bits are extra "1" bits which follow the data and any parity bit. They mark the end of a unit of transmission (normally a byte or character).

For example, characters on an EIA-232 serial line may have one or two stop bits added. Some UARTs even allow for 1.5 stop bits but one is probably the most commonly used. A serial connection may be described as, for example, "8N1" which means eight data bits, no parity and one stop bit.

stop bit

In asynchronous communications, a bit transmitted after each character.
References in periodicals archive ?
"He used to say the full stop bit when telling the story, as he often did."
Triggering can be set relative to the start bit, stop bit, restart, or No Ack command as well as on a specific data or address value.
The settings you use for your modem software are: 8 Data Bits, No Parity, and 1 Stop Bit. Terminal emulation is preferably ANSI, or TTY if ANSI is not available.
The CID-BBS can be accessed at 212/727-8219, N-8-1 (no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit).
For best results, set your communications software for eight data bits, one stop bit, and no parity.
A 300- or 1200-baud modem is needed to access the Tree (0 parity, full duplex, 1 stop bit, 8 data bits).
The mark at the end of the character is called the "stop bit." The stop bit ensures that there will always be at least one mark in every character and that bit timing is correct.
The settings you use for your modem software are: 8 data bits; no parity; and 1 stop bit. Terminal emulation is preferably ANSI, or TTY if ANSI is not available.
Other settings are: no parity, 8 data bits, one stop bit, full duplex and VT100/ANSI emulation.
That's because each character requires eight bits to send the character, plus a start and a stop bit: 30,000 bits total.