stoppage


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stoppage

[′stäp·ij]
(ordnance)
A jam in an automatic weapon; the condition of a weapon being jammed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stoppage

/sto'p*j/ Extreme lossage that renders something (usually something vital) completely unusable. "The recent system stoppage was caused by a fried transformer."
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in classic literature ?
The men rode and ran by turn, and the dogs were kept on the jump, with but infrequent stoppages.
We are indebted to that for seeing a woman like Dorothea degrading herself by marrying him." Sir James made little stoppages between his clauses, the words not coming easily.
They think of doing something for young Tulliver; he saved them from a considerable loss by riding home in some marvellous way, like Turpin, to bring them news about the stoppage of a bank, or something of that sort.
The train did not proceed rapidly; counting the stoppages, it did not run more than twenty miles an hour, which was a sufficient speed, however, to enable it to reach Omaha within its designated time.
Following the directions he received, they arrived, after two or three puzzled stoppages for consideration, and some uncertain looking about them, at the door of Miss Abbey Potterson's dominions.
At length, after a rapid race, frequently interrupted by prudent stoppages, they reached the deep grottoes, in which the prophetic bishop of Vannes had taken care to have secreted a bark capable of keeping the sea at this fine season.
Arthur being now awakened by the jolting and the stoppages, we all got out and walked.
After passing and repassing the carriage on the road, and being passed and repassed by it sundry times in the course of the night, according as their stoppages were longer or shorter; or their rate of travelling varied, they reached the town almost together.
Each of these stoppages was made at a doleful grating, by which any languishing good airs that were left uncorrupted, seemed to escape, and all spoilt and sickly vapours seemed to crawl in.
The average length of a work stoppage beginning in 2006 was 26.5 days, up from 20 days in 2005.
During the work stoppage by members of the United Food and Commercial Workers' Union some analysts estimated that it would result in a loss of up to $2 billion for Safeway Inc., Kroger Co.
In general, licensees were more prepared for this work stoppage than they were for the league's last one, in 1994.