stopping power


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stopping power

[′stäp·iŋ ‚pau̇·ər]
(nucleonics)
The energy lost by a charged particle passing through a substance per unit length of path; related concepts are mass, atomic, molecular, and relative stopping power. Also known as linear energy transfer (LET); linear stopping power.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nifty little carbine never had much of a reputation for stopping power, but at the close range you anticipate, it should do well if your girls learn to shoot it well.
With four friction surfaces the new technology can provide up to 1.9 times the stopping power of a conventional single disc system of the same diameter.
In recent years they have become extremely sophisticated, thanks largely to advances in electronics, and some use engine power to create even greater stopping power in the event of an emergency.
To handle the massive amount of power there are huge-diameter four-piston brakes front and rear, with the option of ceramic composites for even better stopping power.
It comes with traction control and brake assist, which help to keep the car on an even keel, and to aid its prodigious stopping power.
Immense stopping power from brakes straight out of the 911, delicately balanced steering, poised but entertaining handling and full-on, twin- exhaust soundtrack make for a hugely involving driving experience.
SARGODHA -- Faisalabad Electric Supply Company (FESCO) has started operation in the circle for stopping power theft.
As a 26-year law enforcement veteran, I learned more than a decade ago that stopping power with a handgun is a myth.
It features four barrels of stopping power and a tip-up barrel and can reliably be fired from within a purse or pocket.
In addition, wet disc brakes are used as opposed to drum brakes, delivering a long life and better stopping power while virtually eliminating brake maintenance and adjustments.
Thanks to Dave Spaulding for taking on a question with no right answer ("Stopping Power," April/May).