stored-program computer


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stored-program computer

[′stȯrd ¦prō‚gram kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A digital computer which executes instructions that are stored in main memory as patterns of data.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1949, the first stored-program computer was built by engineer Maurice Wilkes, but it was 1960, after ICs came about, that Digital Equipment Corp.
Because on type-written paper a lower-case "x" could be read as "multiply" and "/" as "divide." As the typewriter went electric and became a terminal, two additions had to be made: "zero" and "one" could no longer be upper-case "O" and lower-case "1." Otherwise, data processing is still operating in the pre-computer age defined by this old keyboard (and by "computer" I mean the modern, stored-program computer originally conceived by John von Neumann).
Like several other recent studies of data processing history, Pugh emphasizes the continuity between IBM's pre-war experience with the punched-card accounting machines bequeathed to it by Hollerith and its post-war activities with the electronic stored-program computer. Here his firm grasp of technology serves him especially well.
The strength of this book is in its tracing the continuous chain of events from Leibniz's early attempt at a calculus of propositions all the way through to the stored-program computers of our own time.
During the four decades since the development of the first stored-program computers, there has been much evolution in processor architecture, in past as a response to the increasing complexity of the requirements.