stoup


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stoup

, stoop
1. a small basin for holy water
2. Scot and northern English dialect a bucket or drinking vessel
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stoup

A basin for holy water, sometimes free-standing but more often affixed to or carved out of a wall or pillar near the entrance of a church.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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From Caleb Regan, managing editor: My wife, Gwen, makes a soup-stew we call "stoup," which is great for using up vegetables that are close to turning.
Liautaud and Stoup arrived at the geographic South Pole on Christmas Eve, having faced gale-force winds, temperatures that dipped below -50 degrees Celsius (-58 degrees Fahrenheit) and three-meter-high sastrugi, or frozen waves in the ice.
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Philip Stoup, Note, The Development and Failure of Social Norms in Second Life, 58 DUKE L.J.
The Foundation was founded in 1954 by a Stoup of passionate real estate professionals concerned about the financial risks facing the brokerage community.
Attending a joint meeting on the side line of the gathering of the world`s chamber of commences, Mohammad Nahavandian and John Stoup discussed expansion of bilateral interactions especially those between the two countries` private sectors.
I would have to say that Doug Stoup on my Polar expedition did not have to put up with any of the mood swings I suffered when riding in the early 90s - for the simple reason I wasn't sat in a sauna for many hours!
Dunwoody and American explorer Doug Stoup reached the pole on January 18, following a course not attempted since Ernest Shackleton's failed bid in 1914.
Any random Stoup can now get together to push For recognition as "parents" of a child.