stovepipe

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stovepipe

a pipe that serves as a flue to a stove
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stovepipe

[′stōv‚pīp]
(engineering)
Large-diameter pipe made of sheet steel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stovepipe

A metal pipe for conducting smoke, gases, etc., from a stove to a chimney flue.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ray Townsend, commanding officer of a P3 training and operations squadron in the Royal Canadian Air Force, fears more stovepiped systems even as the training and simulation technology improves.
Although less stovepiped than those divisions responsible for planning, the COD can still integrate more effectively during ATO execution.
Yet, after the 2002 LRS merger the LRS developed into a functionally stovepiped organization.
The luxury of relying on stovepiped systems is not an option in a contingency environment largely because the enemy and requirements to support the warfighter are ever changing.
The final step in ensuring that police information and intelligence is not "stovepiped" within military police channels requires that the S2 generate and disseminate PIO products.
The current regulatory rules ensure that state agencies will continue building tomorrow's "stovepiped" systems today--larger and more secure than they ever were.
But what is new is the need to be less stovepiped and to more closely integrate our capabilities with our interagency partners.
In that "stovepiped," rule-laden environment, how can metros collaborate with Washington to focus on key challenges?
Before the development of Web 2.0 technologies, for example, it would have taken many months to gather information across stovepiped government agencies.
It occurs to me that many of the "core values" that appear on most of today's government agency Web sites (transparency, inclusiveness, agility, citizen-centered ness, etc.) would be much better served by this kind of machinery than by the cumbersome, secretive, stovepiped, and hierarchical arrangements most commonly identified with old-line public-sector bureaucracies.
Move beyond stovepiped data-storage systems to create a central data base of information to expedite full electronic information exchange.