stovewood

stovewood

[′stōv‚wu̇d]
(materials)
Firewood sawed into short lengths for use in a stove.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yesterday's sentencing followed the latest trial to arise out of Operation Stovewood - the massive National Crime Agency (NCA) investigation into the sexual exploitation of teenagers in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013.
Operation Stovewood is the largest child sexual exploitation and abuse inquiry in the UK.
The arrests are part of the ongoing Operation Stovewood investigation.
Operation Stovewood is looking into abuse in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013.
The agency's Operation Stovewood was set up last year following Prof Alexis Jay's damning report which estimated at least 1,400 children had been subjected to CSE by largely Asian men in the South Yorkshire town between 1997 and 2013.
This stove-quality wood gave the building material its name: stovewood (also known as cordwood).
Door County, Wis., has numerous fine examples of turn-of-the-century cordwood structures (called "stovewood" at the time).
Topped by hand-carved cupolas, with walls built of glacier-driven fieldstone or leftover stovewood, painted red, white or clad in a utilitarian, protective coating of spent off, or perhaps bare of paint altogether, these backroad barns show the resourcefulness of the American farmer of 100 years ago.
In it Rob has a section on "Infilling with Stovewood Masonry," page 105.
In 1979, Dublin's Dolman Press published his poems and translation from the Irish as Too Small for Stovewood, Too Big for Kindling.
They burned stovewood, plowed with horses, maintained numerous farm stands, helped or bartered with their neighbors, and disdained pecuniary ostentation.