straddle

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straddle

1. Athletics a high-jumping technique in which the body is parallel with the bar and the legs straddle it at the highest point of the jump
2. (in poker) the stake put up after the ante in poker by the second player after the dealer
3. Irish a wooden frame placed on a horse's back to which panniers are attached
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
From this vantage point of a straddler, it is honestly impossible to tell whether Dhoni's presence at the World Cup is a good thing or not, or whether his waning batting prowess will be made up for by his waxing wicketkeeping and ever-present leadership skills.
In this study, I apply "cultural straddlers" (Carter 2006) to the linguistic realm with the expression "linguistic straddlers." In fact, it was found that in Quebec City many Quebec English-speakers are bicultural and able to navigate different cultural codes (Magnan 2012:20).
As Alfred Lubano wrote in Limbo: Blue-Collar Roots, White-Collar Dreams (2004), class migrants--whom he referred to as straddlers--are "aware of their otherness throughout their lives" and remain "perpetual outsiders." (174) Indeed, it is in that status as "straddlers" or "limbo folk" that part of these professors' value lies for diversity purposes.
In the other drawing, the straddler is more a tomboy who, at some awkward pubescent stage in which kissing is an embarrassment, wrestles the object of her affection to the ground (here the viewer is akin to a rival).
Within the educational policy arena, the mayor, Interim Superintendent and the four members of the newly elected school board majority served in "straddler" roles despite the fact that they were public officials.
Marcus characterized this New Yorker piece as the first indication of Franzen's developing animus toward radically innovative writing: "'FC2' is a harmless bit of writing with a rigged premise, but in retrospect the piece can be read as a warm-up for a series of sucker punches against an unlikely, powerless target: the high-powered, stuffed-with-cash, culturally tremendous world of marginal, non-narrative writing that secretly controls the world--a target that will, over the next nine years, take so many body blows from Franzen, the future heavyweight pundit, culture straddler, and angry realist, that one can very nearly hear it wheezing its last, dismal, low-sales-figure breath" (44).
In fact some people called him The Straddler because he could be on both sides of the fence at the same time.
That sentiment has earned him the execration of every abolitionist and neo-abolitionist, from Garrison to (most recently) Ebony editor Lerone Bennett, whose book Forced into Glory: Abraham Lincoln's White Dream depicts Lincoln as a callous white racist, the kind of fence straddler "we find in almost all situations of oppression." For all of his rant, Lincoln biographers will ignore Bennett at their peril, because both Garrison and Bennett had a point: Lincoln's best plan for emancipation (without the helping hand of the war) was a gradualized scheme that would have allowed the grandparents of some of today's adult African Americans to have been born in slavery.