strafe


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strafe

[strāf]
(ordnance)
To rake a body of troops or other persons with gunfire or rocket fire at close range and from a flying aircraft, or to attack a roadway, railyard, factory, or other installation with bullets, projectiles, or rockets fired from a low firing airplane.
References in periodicals archive ?
As I maneuvered for a strafe pass, I rolled the jet to the right and pulled my gun cross to the target.
Mitch boasts an extensive gaming background and is excited to bring his knowledge and experience to Strafe Gaming Lounge.
He was in position to execute a live banner strafe when he depressed the trigger and no rounds were fired.
The Strafe experience isn't limited to individual walk-in game play; group discounts, tournaments, private parties, lock-ins, contests , board games, movies, Wi-Fi and internet surfing are all part of the fun.
Between the 1st and 2nd GBU-12 attacks, our flight lead began coordinating with the JTAC to get some High Angle Strafe (HAS) passes for training purposes.
Currently, on a 7,000-acre zone called the Northern Impact Area, artillery gunners pound targets, planes strafe the land, and tanks fire nonexplosive slugs.
The SpaceOrb 360 applies breakthrough technology to create the ultimate 3D game experience-players can pitch, yaw, strafe and jump in any combination simultaneously with just a touch of the finger or twist of the SpaceOrb 360's PowerSensor(R) ball.
Following a two-target strafe pass, he heard a loud pop from the nose of the aircraft followed immediately by the loss of all pitot-static gauges and illumination of the gun unsafe master caution light.
This must have proved a tempting target to the Japanese fighters assigned to strafe the airfield - they couldn't miss the planes packed in neat rows.
On his fourth pass and first strafe attack in the Leach Lake Training Area, he heard a loud pop and felt a large thump underneath the aircraft.
The four-man gang used their AKs to strafe the the car before fleeing empty-handed.
AS you kick your way through the latest beat-'em-up or strafe the opposition in your favourite flight sim, spare a thought for the children of London's Great Ormond Street Hospital.