straight man


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straight man

a subsidiary actor who acts as stooge to a comedian
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"We realized we hadn't seen this before -- a gay man and a straight man sitting at a desk, talking over the headlines of the day in a comedic way, and this really appealed to us,'' Post said.
And again, Rudd plays a straight man in 'Dinner For Schmucks' as he takes Carell's hapless Barry Speck to a group dinner in a bid to win a prize for the biggest idiot.
I wanted to make more space for what it means to be a straight man. It's not just gay men who are allowed to be emotional or demonstrative.
It's a make-over programme in which five gay men give advice to a straight man who has let himself go and wants to win back the favours of his lady.
There's a lot for SpongeBob to get down about, but he loves his job, makes us laugh, inspires any number of also-rans, and plays the straight man masterfully.
Morrisson plays the weary and unwitting straight man for a gaggle of local crazies, misfits, and visiting evangelists.
Contestants were offered $1m if they picked a straight man or straight woman from among gay and straight suitors.
In the Vice Presidential debate when John Edwards outsmarmed even Aaron Brown and said to the Vice Cusser, "Your daughter is a lesbian," it sounded like, "Bummer, man, too bad about your straight man's burden." When John "Bad Man" Kerry echoed that sentiment, he violated Don't Ask, Don't Tell and tipped all the undecided-on-their-values voters into the red of embarrassment.
In Tales of the City, which the San Francisco Chronicle began to serialize in 1976, Armistead Maupin created the character of Brian Hawkins, a straight man who lived, worked, and socialized in the gay universe of 1970's San Francisco.
Crocodile Dundee star Paul Hogan is to abandon his testosterone-charged image to play a straight man who pretends to be gay, in a new Australian comedy called Strange Bedfellows.
The tale of their rise to stardom and thirty-year partnership--from the waning days of vaudeville to the golden age of Hollywood--is styled as a memoir told by arch straight man Sharp.