straight-line theory

straight-line theory

In the analysis of reinforced concrete members, theory based on the assumption that stresses and strains in a member under flexure vary in proportion to the distance from the neutral axis.
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Table 6a simply rearranges the previous Table 6 to make it easier to visualize generational status for both racialized and non-racialized minority groups (as two columns) and thus assess straight-line theory. For non-racialized minorities, straight-line theory appears to hold as the SCCII score essentially increases with each subsequent generational status from a low of 6.48 to 10.15 for the third generation (which is just slightly lower than 10.27 for the second generation).
In terms of generational analysis, the initial data suggests that straight-line theory appears to hold where recent immigrants are the least integrated and third generation are the most integrated.
Based on data from a survey of 294 men and women of Armenian descent living in Central California, the study provides a contemporary demographic snapshot of one of the oldest Armenian communities in the U.S., explores assimilation and ethnic retention across generations as a test of straight-line theory, examines the forms of ethnic identity and ethnicity that persist through the third and fourth generations, and investigates the phenomenon of intermarriage and its implications.