strain


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Related to strain: strain gauge, Muscle strain

strain:

see strength of materialsstrength of materials,
measurement in engineering of the capacity of metal, wood, concrete, and other materials to withstand stress and strain. Stress is the internal force exerted by one part of an elastic body upon the adjoining part, and strain is the deformation or change in
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.

Strain

 

a pure culture of a species of microorganism in which its morphological and physiological characteristics are studied.

Strains can be isolated from a variety of sources, for example, soil, water, or food, or they can be isolated from a single source at different times. Hence, the same species of bacterium, yeast, or microscopic fungus may have a great many strains, differing from one another in several characteristics, such as sensitivity to antibiotics and capacity to produce toxins and enzymes. Commercial strains of microorganisms developed as a result of selection and used in industry for the microbiological synthesis of proteins (including enzymes), antibiotics, vitamins, and organic acids are much more productive than wild strains.

strain

[strān]
(biology)
An intraspecific group of organisms that possess only one or a few distinctive traits and are maintained as an artificial breeding group.
(cell and molecular biology)
A population of cells derived either from a primary culture or from a cell line by the selection or cloning of cells having specific properties or markers.
(mechanics)
Change in length of an object in some direction per unit undistorted length in some direction, not necessarily the same; the nine possible strains form a second-rank tensor.

strain

A change in the form or shape of a body or material which is subjected to an external force.

strain

Any deformation or deflection in a body caused by stress. The strain is directly proportional to the stress, as a load is applied until the proportional limit is reached. Beyond that point, the strain may increase at a changing rate until the yield stress is reached, but the part will return to its original size and shape when the load is removed and the strain is zero. The body will be deformed if the yield stress is exceeded. The strain is recorded as the change of size over the original size.

strain

1
1. Music a theme, melody, or tune
2. a feeling of tension and tiredness resulting from overwork, worry, etc.; stress
3. a particular style or recurring theme in speech or writing
4. Physics the change in dimension of a body under load expressed as the ratio of the total deflection or change in dimension to the original unloaded dimension. It may be a ratio of lengths, areas, or volumes

strain

2
1. a group of organisms within a species or variety, distinguished by one or more minor characteristics
2. a variety of bacterium or fungus, esp one used for a culture
References in periodicals archive ?
 This strain was introduced by Ken Estes in 2003 and is known for its potent effects in both mind and body.
Static load cells are used for low strain rate testing, and are usually strain gauge based systems.
M2 EQUITYBITES-November 26, 2018-Abattis Bioceuticals Acquires Select Strains in Deal Valued at USD 5m
The effects of the following three parameters were studied in multiaxial ratcheting tests: (a) axial stress, (b) shear strain amplitude, and (c) shear strain rate.
Two sequences (strains 5 and 6) belonged to GV, which has not yet been reported in Japan.
From IBL Japan's efforts to breed strains from labs in Japan, Abe realizes that transgenic breeding requires a significant amount of skill.
With the reverse genetics method, scientists can splice the desired genes--six from the harmless strain and the HA and NA genes from the circulating strain (which have already been adjusted to be nonvirulent)--into small circular pieces of DNA called "plasmids." The plasmids are then transfected into animal cells, and the vaccine seed virus grows.
"In contrast to live attenuated vaccines, only a small portion of the genetic material will be used, therefore there is no risk that the vaccine could mutate or combine with naturally occurring influenza viruses to produce new strains, or recombine with human influenza strains which would have devastating global consequences."
Together, the cyclic stress strain curve and the strain-life curve enable designers to account for local stress-strain conditions at stress concentrations like fillets.