strain aging

strain aging

[′strān ‚āj·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
Change of mechanical properties of a metal by aging induced by plastic deformation.
References in periodicals archive ?
[6] describe the metallurgical aspects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) in C-Mn steel.
According to Cottrell and Bilby, strain aging and the subsequent phenomenon, that is, yield point elongation, could be controlled by the concentration of the interstitial solute atoms and of the mobile dislocation density.
However, because cold forging causes a temperature increase due to plastic deformation, it is also necessary to consider dynamic strain aging 2,3).
During those tests for carbon steel material under hot temperatures, a strain aging effect can be developed.
Reduction of the plastic properties of metal pipes is due to strain aging and may cause a discrepancy of mechanical properties regulatory performance, and in some cases, the cause of brittle fracture of pipelines.
A phenomenological model of strain aging was discussed.
When the slip step is large and strain rate is high as in the case of dynamic strain aging, we have observed a spike of AE activity.
The hot air stress strain aging results for 504 hours at 150[degrees]C are presented in figure 6.
During heating, the carbon atoms in the steel collect around the dislocations, a process called strain aging, Murr says.
Noticeable yield point differences exist upon comparison of the 0% pre-strained sample (initial quasistatic tensile testing to failure) and the yielding behavior of the reloaded samples, and this difference is attributed to room temperature strain aging following pre-straining as noted in Figure 2(a).
The refinement of grain size with least concentration of interstitial elements of the Cu-30Zn brass reduces the pronounced yield point and strain aging problems during forming [2].