strain rate

strain rate

[′strān ‚rāt]
(mechanics)
The time rate for the usual tensile test.
References in periodicals archive ?
The number near a curve in Figures 10(a) and 10(b) stands for the strain rate; and the numbers near a curve in Figures 10(c) and 10(d) represent the average corrosion degree, respectively.
Lajtai et al [5] investigated the effect of strain rate on deformation for brittle limestone ductile salt rock.
As it is commonly known, most thermosetting polymers have a strain rate and temperature dependence on their mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield strain) [16,17].
Besides, the mechanical properties of nanoplates can also be influenced by factors such as size, temperature, and strain rate [1].
In a variety of rock engineering and geophysical applications, such as earthquakes, mining, civil engineering, petroleum engineering, and physical geography, rock materials are in a dynamic loading state, where the strain rate is in the range of [10.sup.-4] to [10.sup.3] [1, 2].
Both of the changes illustrated here, in the tensile tests on PP and the impact tests on PVC, could also have been created by keeping the strain rate the same and changing the temperature at which the test was performed.
At present, these methods have been widely used in the study of the dynamic characteristics of engineering materials under high strain rate like rocks, ceramics, and composites.
High strain rate behavior of the thermoset polymers has frequently been investigated over the past decade [14-17].
These materials are increasingly being used in high strain rate and impact applications.
2D derived strain and strain rate are the newer techniques that are load independent and better markers of tissue deformation and regional ventricular function compared to TDI.