strained-layer superlattice

strained-layer superlattice

[′strānd ¦lā·ər ¦sü·pər′lad·əs]
(electronics)
A structure consisting of alternating layers of two different semiconducting materials, each several nanometers thick, in which a mismatch between the lattice spacings of the two materials of up to several percent is accommodated by elastic strains in the thin layers without the generation of mismatch defects.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
S, Barnelt, SA, Sundgren, J-E, Markert, LC, Greene, JE, "Growth of Single-Crystal TiN/VN Strained-Layer Superlattices with Extremely High Mechanical Hardness." J.
Both metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) systems have continually been applied to the in-house growth of strained-layer superlattices ever since they were pioneered in 1981.[3] The material program operates six MBE growth chambers and three MOCVD systems, spanning a range of activity from novel devices and heterostructures, to fundamental growth science and technology, to development of novel materials.
Zipperian, "Principles and Applications of Semiconductor Strained-layer Superlattices", Semiconductors and Semi-metals, R.