strained-layer superlattice

strained-layer superlattice

[′strānd ¦lā·ər ¦sü·pər′lad·əs]
(electronics)
A structure consisting of alternating layers of two different semiconducting materials, each several nanometers thick, in which a mismatch between the lattice spacings of the two materials of up to several percent is accommodated by elastic strains in the thin layers without the generation of mismatch defects.
References in periodicals archive ?
S, Barnelt, SA, Sundgren, J-E, Markert, LC, Greene, JE, "Growth of Single-Crystal TiN/VN Strained-Layer Superlattices with Extremely High Mechanical Hardness." J.
Both metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) systems have continually been applied to the in-house growth of strained-layer superlattices ever since they were pioneered in 1981.[3] The material program operates six MBE growth chambers and three MOCVD systems, spanning a range of activity from novel devices and heterostructures, to fundamental growth science and technology, to development of novel materials.
Zipperian, "Principles and Applications of Semiconductor Strained-layer Superlattices", Semiconductors and Semi-metals, R.