strategic air warfare


Also found in: Dictionary.

strategic air warfare

[strə′tē·jik ′er ′wȯr‚fār]
(ordnance)
Air combat and supporting operations designed to effect, through the systematic application of force to a selected series of vital targets, the progressive destruction and disintegration of the enemy's war-making capacity to a point where the ability or the will to wage war is no longer retained; vital targets may include key manufacturing systems, sources of raw material, critical material, stockpiles, power systems, transportation systems, communication facilities, concentrations of uncommitted elements of enemy armed forces, key agricultural areas, and other such target systems.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Polar Concept meshed with the "air atomic" or strategic air warfare vision strongly advocated by senior Air Force leaders.
On March 21, 1946, the Army Air Forces sought to operationalize strategic air warfare by creating the Strategic Air Command (SAC).
As strategic air campaigns in World War II showed, there was a vast gulf between the vision of strategic air warfare and the reality of Europe's Combined Bomber Offensive and the strategic bombing campaign against Japan.
(38) Fortunately, the Berlin Airlift's successful application of non-kinetic air power allowed time for the political crisis to diffuse, but increased Cold War tensions focused attention on both the offensive and defensive assumptions of strategic air warfare and the Polar Concept.
If the Navy was allowed a free hand in strategic air warfare, then what was the point of assigning primary and collateral functions and attempting to eliminate redundancy?
The Air Force had been given strategic air warfare as a primary function by the Secretary of Defense, and that decision was ratified by the President.
When Air Force planners began building target information for strategic air warfare, they quickly recognized the paucity of intelligence on the USSR.
He grounds them solidly in the Cold War era, explaining how Warden turned against the prevailing model of AirLand Battle, which he saw as land-centric and dominated by concerns for Close Air Support and other tactical uses of air power, and how Warden turned to ideas of strategic air warfare that had once been at the very root of arguments for an independent air force.
Full browser ?