strategic theory

strategic theory

(INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS) theoretical analysis of the military and associated political strategies pursued by NATION STATES in advancing their own interests. Among the social science theories applied in this area have been ‘decision theory’ and the THEORY OF GAMES. See also ARMS RACE, BALANCE OF POWER, CLAUSEWITZ, COLD WAR, NUCLEAR DETERRENCE, MUTUAL ASSURED DESTRUCTION, NATION-STATE SYSTEM.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
A hierarchical enemy is presupposed in any strategic theory based on Clausewitz, given how he assumed the enemy to be a unified enemy.
Air Commodore Professor Frans Osinga's Science, Strategy and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd (2007) contains the most systematic, detailed, and insightful treatment of Boyd's strategic reasoning and inter-disciplinary reading.
In Developing National Power in Space: A Theoretical Model, author Brent Ziarnick, an instructor at the US Air Force's Space Education and Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and an award-winning writer on military space issues, intricately details a military-type strategic theory for a nation's space program.
Strategic Theory for the 21st Century: The Little Book on Big Strategy.
Some might doubt that a Socratic approach combined with historical inquiry is a foundation of strategic thought, or at least of Brodies, but in truth Strachan thereby described his own approach to strategic theory and practice as well as anyone possibly could.
The generation of asymmetry is the basis of much, if not most, strategic theory, particularly power-specific theories such as those pertaining to seapower or airpower.
Finally, a word is needed in defense of the radio-frequency (RF) spectrum as a domain of warfare, mostly because this domain not only lacks a strategic theory but lacks a strong proponent for theory-building.
Boyd's work, which is best summarized in Frans Osinga's book Science, Strategy and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd, could put us on a different course.
Areas of great relevance and actuality for the organizational sciences, such as the Knowledge-Based View of the firm (Grant, 1996) or the Dynamic Capabilities Theory (Eisenhardt & Martin, 2000; Teece, Pisano, & Shuen, 1997), strongly rely on resource-based strategies, highlighting the main role played by the RBV in the construction of strategic theory. A critical analysis of the RBV that assesses its possible limitations and virtues in the context of current academic and management trends can shed some light not only on the state of the art in RBV-related studies but also on the bearing that this research might follow in years to come.

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