straw bale


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straw bale

An agricultural by-product made from the stems of cereal crops, sugar cane, wheat, oats, rye, rice, barley, and others. Low cost and general availability make straw bales a highly desirable, natural green material. A post-and-beam framework is the most common non-load-bearing construction method, where the framework supports the structure and straw bales are used as infill. Straw bale is a very economical material, but it must be protected from getting wet both during and after construction. See also: Biomaterials
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
While often thought of as a recent technique, straw bale gardening originated in the 1950s, when the pickling industry needed a new way to grow cucumbers.
In Karsten's method, fertiliser is used to convert the insides of a straw bale into composted soil, where seeds are planted.
When it comes to the overall cost for a straw bale house, don't assume it is low.
I know from "conventional" straw bale experience that one can usually just carve bales to allow for any additional size--but here at my house, I've got rows and rows of bales above some of the windows.
The research team will be assessing straw bales and hemp as building materials so that they can be used more widely in the building industry for housing, helping the UK achieve its targets for reducing carbon emissions.
More than 100 straw bales from Netherley were used alongside green oak taken from fallen trees in Woolton Woods.
"Some of the tours are exclusively solar, but we have straw bale homes and earth shelters (some grid-tied and some not), wind and solar generators, cogeneration and geothermal.
The book begins with a brief history of straw bale building, followed by a chapter on the basics of straw as a building material.
New technology added to an old technique is providing satisfactory answers to all these concerns, and a growing number of winery owners are opting for straw bale construction for their new or expanding operations.
Because of these advantages, straw bale buildings in Mongolia are now providing energy savings of 80 percent-plus.
The building, to be completed by the autumn, will have straw bale wall construction, ``green'' oak beams, a living sedum roof, rain water recycling and solar panels.
Earth building, such as cob, straw bale, and adobe, is gaining in popularity due to these homes' overall energy efficiency, longevity, beauty, and low environmental impact.