stream


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stream,

general term applied to all bodies of water flowing in channels regardless of their size. See riverriver,
stream of water larger than a brook or creek. Land surfaces are never perfectly flat, and as a result the runoff after precipitation tends to flow downward by the shortest and steepest course in depressions formed by the intersection of slopes.
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; floodflood,
inundation of land by the rise and overflow of a body of water. Floods occur most commonly when water from heavy rainfall, from melting ice and snow, or from a combination of these exceeds the carrying capacity of the river system, lake, or the like into which it runs.
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.

Stream

 

a term designating all flowing bodies of water, including rivers, mountain streams, brooks formed by rain storms and thaws, and channels, regardless of size and origin. Streams flow over more or less erodable soils, forming a bed or channel. The characteristics of the channel depend on the specific features of the stream, including flow rate, flow velocities, and slope, and also on the properties of the soil. A stream is characterized by fluviomorphological processes, which cause the channel to meander.

stream

[strēm]
(computer science)
A collection of binary digits that are transmitted in a continuous sequence, and from which extraneous data such as control information or parity bits are excluded.
(hydrology)
A body of running water moving under the influence of gravity to lower levels in a narrow, clearly defined natural channel.

stream

i. To deploy the tail chute. Normally, it is used as an instruction on a radio telephone to “stream the tail chute.”
ii. To dispense chaff as solid. It may be dispensed at random intervals or in bursts.
iii. To take off or land in stream (i.e., one after at another in approximately equal intervals).

stream

1. a small river; brook
2. Brit any of several parallel classes of schoolchildren, or divisions of children within a class, grouped together because of similar ability

STREAM

(1)
["STREAM: A Scheme Language for Formally Describing Digital Circuits", C.D. Kloos in PARLE: Parallel Architectures and Languages Europe, LNCS 259, Springer 1987].

stream

(communications)
An abstraction referring to any flow of data from a source (or sender, producer) to a single sink (or receiver, consumer). A stream usually flows through a channel of some kind, as opposed to packets which may be addressed and routed independently, possibly to multiple recipients. Streams usually require some mechanism for establishing a channel or a "connection" between the sender and receiver.

stream

(programming)
In the C language's buffered input/ouput library functions, a stream is associated with a file or device which has been opened using fopen. Characters may be read from (written to) a stream without knowing their actual source (destination) and buffering is provided transparently by the library routines.

stream

(operating system)
Confusingly, Sun have called their modular device driver mechanism "STREAMS".

stream

(operating system)
In IBM's AIX operating system, a stream is a full-duplex processing and data transfer path between a driver in kernel space and a process in user space.

[IBM AIX 3.2 Communication Programming Concepts, SC23-2206-03].

stream

(communications)

stream

(programming)

stream

(1) To transmit live or on-demand audio or video content while users listen or watch. This was the original meaning of the term; however, it has evolved to become a synonym for "transmit" and is used to refer to transmitting wired or wireless from any source to a destination. See streaming.

(2) The continuous flow of data from one place to another.

(3) Any contiguous group of bytes or chunk/block of data.

(4) The I/O management in the C programming language. A stream is a channel through which data flows to/from a disk, keyboard, printer, etc.

(5) The data part of a Structured Storage file. See Structured Storage.
References in classic literature ?
With a quick motion of his hand, as he sat in the awning- covered stern with Tom, Ned and the others, Jacinto sent the chunk of meat out into the muddy stream.
A few rough logs, laid side by side, served for a bridge over this stream.
He rested again until the sun was well up and gilding the great river with its splendor, and then he plunged into the stream.
The stream was still there, and singing the same sweet old song.
Now mine own affairs, which are of a spiritual kind and much more important than yours which are carnal, lie on the other side of this stream.
This, Captain Bonneville was assured by a veteran hunter in his company, was the great valley of the Seedske-dee; and the same informant would have fain persuaded him that a small stream, three feet deep, which he came to on the
The river with its broad silver stream shall serve you in no stead, for all the bulls you offered him and all the horses that you flung living into his waters.
But the most annoying hindrance we encountered was from a multitude of crooked boughs, which, shooting out almost horizontally from the sides of the chasm, twisted themselves together in fantastic masses almost to the surface of the stream, affording us no passage except under the low arches which they formed.
At length they emerged upon a stream of clear water, one of the forks of Powder River, and to their great joy beheld once more wide grassy meadows, stocked with herds of buffalo.
He looked a moment at his "unsteadfast footing," then let his gaze wander to the swirling water of the stream racing madly beneath his feet.
Then a stone, who saw what had happened, came up and kindly offered to help poor Chanticleer by laying himself across the stream; and this time he got safely to the other side with the hearse, and managed to get Partlet out of it; but the fox and the other mourners, who were sitting behind, were too heavy, and fell back into the water and were all carried away by the stream and drowned.
It was plain that they had shoved off a native canoe and embarked upon the bosom of the stream, and as the ape-man's eye ran swiftly down the course of the river beneath the shadows of the overarching trees he saw in the distance, just as it rounded a bend that shut it off from his view, a drifting dugout in the stern of which was the figure of a man.