hyperglycemia

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hyperglycemia:

see diabetesdiabetes
or diabetes mellitus
, chronic disorder of glucose (sugar) metabolism caused by inadequate production or use of insulin, a hormone produced in specialized cells (beta cells in the islets of Langerhans) in the pancreas that allows the body to use and store
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.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hyperglycemia

 

increase in the sugar content of blood to over 120 milligram percent. Temporary hyperglycemia can occur in healthy individuals after intake of large quantities of sugar (so-called nutritional hyperglycemia), during intense pains, and during stress. Chronic hyperglycemia occurs in conjunction with diabetes mellitus, certain other endocrine diseases, deficiency of vitamins C and B1, febricity, hypoxia, and other conditions.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyperglycemia

[¦hī·pər‚glī′sē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Excessive amounts of sugar in the blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hyperglycaemia

(US), hyperglycemia
Pathol an abnormally large amount of sugar in the blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Long-term exposure to stress-induced hyperglycemia is linked to an increased incidence of infections and sepsis, multiorgan failure, and mortality.
* Acute encephalopathy with stress-induced hyperglycemia.
In addition, the stress reaction causes activation of the neuroendocrine system increasing catecholamine levels and levels of cortisol and growth hormone, which together lead to stress-induced hyperglycemia.[sup][19] However, this hyperglycemia could be harmful for ischemic myocardium.

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