stress-strain diagram

stress-strain diagram

A diagram in which corresponding values of stress are plotted against strain; values of stress usually are plotted as ordinates (vertically) and values of strain as abscissas (horizontally).
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Therefore, we should look for a universal function, not for a specific stress-strain diagram and phase diagram of a concrete or a reinforced concrete element M-(1/r), which can be represented by irregular fractional-rational functions (5) or (7), since they allow us to describe the stress-strain state of a bent and centrally or eccentrically compressed or tensed concrete or a reinforced concrete element.
1-LY11/6/350 strain gauges (SG) were used (see Figure 2) to measure the strain, which was recalculated into stress using the true stress-strain diagram obtained from the coupon tests.
To understand the annealed state of copper, a full comprehension of its stress-strain diagram is vital.
The strength of thermal-insulating materials under compression should be assessed considering the specifics of deformations development, which manifests itself best in the stress-strain diagram (Vaitkus et al.
The stress-strain diagram with limited descending branch of the concrete (Typ, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 2003) and bilinear stress-strain relation for the bar reinforcement were used (Fig.
ACI Committee 363-1992 [11] reported that as the concrete strength increases for HSC, the post peak portion of the stress-strain diagram almost vanishes or descents steeply.
2b) initiation of damage also corresponds to the transition from the initial linear part of the stress-strain diagram to the non-linear behaviour.
Figure 1a provides the stress-strain diagram experimentally obtained from a wire with a diameter of 1 mm.
To account for the non-linearity of stress-strain relationship in the calculation of measured flexural strength, he replaced the curvilinear tensile stress-strain diagram by a simple rectangular stress diagram with the same dimensional constraints proposed by Whitney.
A tensilgram in engineering language is a stress-strain diagram and the area under the curve is the thermodynamic equivalent of work (figure 1).