stria


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stria

1. Geology any of the parallel scratches or grooves on the surface of a rock caused by abrasion resulting from the passage of a glacier, motion on a fault surface, etc.
2. fine ridges and grooves on the surface of a crystal caused by irregular growth
3. Biology anatomy a narrow band of colour or a ridge, groove, or similar linear mark, usually occurring in a parallel series
4. Architect a narrow channel, such as a flute on the shaft of a column
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stria

[′strī·ə]
(biology)
A minute line, band, groove, or channel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stria

1. A fillet.
2. A rib, esp. one repeated to give texture.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By oneway Anova test, it was found that there was significant difference in degeneration grades of all parameters (organ of corti, spiral ganglion, and stria vascularis) among the three groups (p<0.05).
There is no study showing the GLUT expression in the OHCs; only some studies elucidate GLUT expression in the stria vascularis and the spiral ligament.
Note the exponential increase in stria. C1 shows little striation.
Stigma located at the end of the median stria. Striaeuniseriate, straight to slightly radiate, with central striae more widely spaced than the others.
Caption: This caterpillar species, Lygomusotima stria, is currently undergoing testing at the ARS quarantine facility in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Ethanol's actions alter or produce lasting synaptic plasticity in a variety of brain regions, including two regions with key roles in alcohol's actions as well as in control of alcohol intake, namely the striatum and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST).
Stuber wanted to focus on one cell type -- gaba neurons in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, or BNST.
The mechanisms controlling stria formation are unclear, although it has been suggested that daily fluctuations in illumination, seawater temperature, and food availability may control deposition (Clark 1968, Kirby-Smith 1970, Wrenn 1972, Broom & Mason 1978, Wallace & Reisnes 1985, Wilson 1987).
And since its inception in 1988, the company has given Chicagoans their first look at a number of works, earning critical kudos for the Midwest premieres of Julie Jensen's Stria Dogs, Adam Rapp Blackbird and Lee Blessing's Great Falls, among others.
The following morphometric measurements were made to assist in taxonomic determination (Table 1): cell length (DIC); valve width (SEM and TEM); number of fibulae and striae per 10 [micro]m, number of rows of poroids in each stria (SEM and TEM); poroid number per 1 [micro]m (TEM); and the pattern of perforations in the hymen of each poroid (TEM).
major vowel represented in the word sounds by the letters A E O I a e o i pha seo mannite = inosite, a non-fermentable saccharine substance A I O E a i o ae a fi brino genae mia a condition due to lack of fibrinogen in the blood A O I E a o y i a zido thy midi ne has been used to inhibit the replication of HIV E I O A e i o a preio ta tion in Slavonic languages, a palatal glide before a vowel E I U O e y u o phe ny lbu tazo ne is used as an analgesic for relief of rheumatic pain E O U I e o u i gale no bismu ti te is a sulphide of lead and bismuth I A O U i a o u stria to -crenu late in biology: striped with a notched edge eg.