stridulation


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stridulation

[‚strij·ə′lā·shən]
(invertebrate zoology)
Creaking and other audible sounds made by certain insects, produced by rubbing various parts of the body together.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Stridulation as a primary antipredator defense of a beetle.
Sound production in Scolytidae: Stridulation by female Dendroctonus beetles.
Anterior telopods (Figs 3E-G): Harp with two strongly pronounced stridulation ribs--one long and well pronounced rib located mesally of a less pronounced and shorter one.
The 3 different adults whose stridulation spectra are shown in Fig.
Yamia lacks stridulation setae, has ALE larger than PLE, and the fovea is slightly procurved.
Entomologists argue about whether this pattern means stridulation evolved several times in ants or whether the Adam and Eve of ant ancestors rasped to each other but some descendants lost the ability.
Schizocosa vary in their use of seismic and visual displays in courtship communication, ranging from stationary palpal stridulation with little detectable movement through to combinations of stridulation and percussion along with extravagant raising and waving of ornamented legs (Uetz 2000; Stratton 2005).
Seismic signals are produced by palpal drumming (as is seen in several species within Clade B), or by stridulation (seen in Clade A).
Keywords: Stridulation, Thailand, Singapore, courtship, mate check
Acoustic/vibratory signals in spiders can be produced in three ways, according to Uetz & Stratton (1982): a) stridulation (22 families), b) percussion (six families) and c) vibration of structures (two families).
Such theories are highly speculative, but here, beneath this pictograph, the sounds of the dawn rise up from the gentle bow of the river, the narrowing of the canyon: The ebbing stridulations of the crickets, the incipient bird song and the gravelly purr of the creek.
Consider the "tappings, stridulations, strokings, graspings, nudgings, antennations, tastings and puffings and streakings of chemicals among the ants that evoke various responses from simple recognition to recruitment and alarm" as described by the foremost myrmecologists of our time Bert Holldobler and Edward O.