stridulation


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stridulation

[‚strij·ə′lā·shən]
(invertebrate zoology)
Creaking and other audible sounds made by certain insects, produced by rubbing various parts of the body together.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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japonica produce sound by stridulation. The social and physiological roles of sound production are also discussed.
Anterior telopods (Figs 3E-G): Harp with two strongly pronounced stridulation ribs--one long and well pronounced rib located mesally of a less pronounced and shorter one.
(2005), a stridulatory seta needs to have a strong and rigid appearance, so that it can withstand the intense friction of stridulation. Studies such as those by Biicherl (1957), Perez-Miles et al.
Washington, July 2 (ANI): A study has found a fresh water insect that is the loudest animal on Earth relative to its body size, which produces sound by rubbing its penis against its abdomen in a process known as "stridulation".
Stridulation has been identified in many coleopteran families (Wessel 2006) but relatively more is known about the morphology of the stridulatory organs in most of these species than about the acoustic characteristics and behavioral roles of the signals.
There may be stridulation, tymbal, and percussional vibration (Claridge 1985; Hoy and Robert 1996; Gogala 2006; Hoch et al.
stridulation: The chirping noise made when two body parts, usually appendages, are rubbed together.
9:45 BEHAVIORAL ROLE OF STRIDULATION IN THE ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION OF THE BLACK IMPORTED FIRE ANT, SOLENOPSIS RICHTERI FOREL
Relation of sexual dimorphism in the wings, potential stridulation and illumination to mating of oriental fruit fly, melon flies, and Mediterranean fruit fly in Hawaii.
vipera) emit a noise by rubbing together the keels of their lateral scales (known as stridulation), thus avoiding water loss through hissing.
Seahorse clicks could come from a stridulation, an underwater version of a cricket's sound, the researchers suggest.