strike-slip fault


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to strike-slip fault: normal fault, dip-slip fault

strike-slip fault

[′strīk ¦slip ‚fȯlt]
(geology)
A fault whose direction of movement is parallel to the strike of the fault. Also known as strike-shift fault.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bending deformation of straight pipeline appears under the bending moment caused by the strike-slip fault.
1987) formed initially as strike-slip faults, later re-activated as normal faults.
The fact that big earthquakes can pop off where they're not expected, like along strike-slip faults in the eastern Indian Ocean, suggests that future surprises may lie in store.
Strike-slip fault: A strike-slip fault is a boundary where two tectonic plates grind against each other in opposite directions.
17) Furthermore, large-scale strike-slip faults are considered to have played a significant role in the lateral movement of Tibetan crust towards the east due to the northwards penetration of India into Asia.
As these ridge sections have been subducted, extensive strike-slip faults developed and fragmented the multiple components of the margin.
2) The largest 1993 aftershock occurring 3 hours and 50 minutes after the main shock indicated left-lateral strike-slip fault dipping 64[degrees] to the north and striking E 04[degrees]S; and
2) are possibly coeval with the NW-striking dextral strike-slip faults that were identified by Jutras et al.
These kindred geologic gashes are called strike-slip faults, because during earthquakes, land on one side slides horizontally past land on the other side.
They are near an active geologic feature called a strike-slip fault where two tectonic plates slide past each other like two hands rubbing against each other.
Specific topics include strike-slip fault, terminal moraine, tsunami, weathering, Yellowstone National Park, mass wasting, Kaapvaal craton, ichnofossils, greenstone belts, geodesy, El Nino, desalination, carbon cycle, and aa lava.
According to EQE, the earthquake appears to have caused a 20-kilometer rupture on a strike-slip fault that is geologically similar to the San Andreas Fault in California and the fault in Kobe, Japan, that caused a destructive earthquake in 1995.