striking

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striking

1. Cutting a molding with a plane.
2. Removing temporary supports from a structure.
References in classic literature ?
This character --which showed itself so strikingly in everything about him, and the effect of which we seek to convey to the reader--went no deeper than his station, habits of life, and external circumstances.
In one sense, this picture had almost faded into the canvas, and hidden itself behind the duskiness of age; in another, she could not but fancy that it had been growing more prominent and strikingly expressive, ever since her earliest familiarity with it as a child.
All that, my dear friend, is strikingly true," replied Athos.
Well, strikingly true as it may be, it is not less true, my friend, that I shall return -- greatly beloved by M.
A multitude of small considerations in connection with this subject--trifling enough in themselves, but strikingly important when massed together--had latterly led my mind to a conclusion which I resolved to verify.
Catherick had been living there in service at the same time, we knew also--first, that Anne had been born in June, eighteen hundred and twenty-seven; secondly, that she had always presented an extraordinary personal resemblance to Laura; and, thirdly, that Laura herself was strikingly like her father.
that my own features were partly repeated in her face, and so strikingly that the world might see them
Her forehead had been strikingly expressive of an engrossing terror and compassion that saw nothing but the peril of the accused.
Though more than sixty years had elapsed since the pilgrims came, this crowd of their descendants still showed the strong and sombre features of their character perhaps more strikingly in such a stern emergency than on happier occasions.
Chimborazo is not particularly low, nor are the caverns of Kentucky so strikingly elevated.
Kennedy's countenance strikingly recalled that of Herbert Glendinning, as Sir Walter Scott has depicted it in "The Monastery"; his stature was above six feet; full of grace and easy movement, he yet seemed gifted with herculean strength; a face embrowned by the sun; eyes keen and black; a natural air of daring courage; in fine, something sound, solid, and reliable in his entire person, spoke, at first glance, in favor of the bonny Scot.
It was a strikingly beautiful figure, in the strictest sense of the word.