stripping analysis

stripping analysis

[′strip·iŋ ə‚nal·ə·səs]
(analytical chemistry)
An analytic process of solutions or concentrations containing ions, in which the ions are electrodeposited onto an electrode, stripped (dissolved) from the material from the electrode, and weighed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stripping analysis is applicable for analyzing compounds in very dilute solutions, as it is sensitive at very low metal concentrations pertaining to 10-9 to 10-12 M levels [19, 20].
Furthermore Pb2+ levels are expected to be present at lower quantification values; hence it is more suitable to use stripping analysis in the case of Pb2+ analyses.
Editors Romero and Molina (no affiliations listed) have collected research articles from around that world that address such topics as electrochemical stripping analysis in water quality control, toxic cyanobacterial blooms found in Italian lakes and ponds and the influence of mined/mineralized areas on the local production of drinking water.
CVS can be used for most plating bath analysis both galvanic and electroless processes, however, a slight modification of the technique must be employed for electrolytes containing iron or in plating baths which use a 'pulse plating' technique--here a mode known as Cyclic Pulse Voltammetric Stripping analysis (CPVS) must be employed.
Optimum experimental conditions for the SW stripping analysis were searched, and found to be a pH of 8, a deposition time of 30 sec, a SW frequency of 30 Hz, a SW amplitude of 25 m, and a step potential of 65 mV.
It is our goal to search for optimum conditions for the adsorptive cathodic stripping analysis of Zn in the presence of PG with square-wave voltammetry in this work.
Wang J, Hocevar SB, Deo RP and Ogorevc B: Carbon-fiber microsensor for in vivo monitoring of trace zinc(II) based on electrochemical stripping analysis.
4] obtained good accuracy and precision at low concentrations by potentiometric stripping analysis.
An approach to stripping analysis that simplifies the testing is the use of disposable electrodes, which can be used once and then thrown away.