stripping ratio

stripping ratio

[′strip·iŋ ‚rā·shō]
(mining engineering)
The unit amount of spoil or waste that must be removed to gain access to a similar unit amount of ore or mineral material.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Operating costs will be higher due to higher stripping ratio. One of the power plants is also on shutdown, which will last until mid-December,' said DMCI Holdings chair and president Isidro Consunji.
He said stripping ratio and heating value of Thar Bloc II was feasible for successful mines operations and that Lignite could be utilised in power plants both at mines mouth as well as suitable locations as Jamshoro, mainly because Lignite can be transported to other places-as done in China, India and Germany.
300 million barrels of oil with a stripping ratio averaging 1:1.
The benefits of this increase in ore reserves will be announced with the economic assessment considering the increased grade and reduced stripping ratio.
Improved pit slope walls as a result of a detailed geotechnical study completed by Genivar and a new mine design developed by Roscoe Postle Associates in 2013 resulted in a 7 per cent decrease in total waste by 114,000 tonnes, thus reducing the stripping ratio from 8.7 to 7.8.
In his keynote addr-ess, he said Thar has a stripping ratio of 6:1, heating value of 11-12 MJ/ Kg, ash 7%, moisture 45-47% and sulphur 0.9-1.3%.
Company cut costs by 12% despite rise in stripping ratio (6.1 from 5.8).
The average stripping ratio of the current open-pit mines is 1.5-2.0 [m.sup.3]/t but is expected to go above 4[m.sup.3]/t in the near future.