stripping shovel

stripping shovel

[′strip·iŋ ‚shəv·əl]
(mining engineering)
A shovel with an especially long boom and stick, enabling it to reach further and pile higher.

stripping shovel

A power shovel which has an especially long boom, permitting it to reach farther and pile higher.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Marion 6360 stripping shovel known as "the Captain" was the flagship machine at the vast Captain mine complex near Cutler, Illinois.
Its operating weight, estimated to be some 15,000 tons, was more than double the weight of the Silver Spade (Bucyrus-Erie 1950-B, last operating stripping shovel at 105-[yd.
Fortunately, Arch Mineral had a Marion 5900 stripping shovel parked at the nearby Leahy mine, which the company had taken over a few years earlier.
Its late twentieth century stripping shovel and walking dragline designs quickly became industry standard and made it an attractive addition to CAT's product line.
By the 1920s, firms such as Marion and Bucyrus were building stripping shovels that ran on caterpillar-style tracks instead of temporary rails, weighed upwards of 1,000 tons and could grab 15 or 20 yards of earth in one bite.
Bucyrus, for example, incorporated a knuckle joint on the knee-action front-end of its 795B mining shovel after field-proving the design in its line of stripping shovels.
Mining and stripping shovels are certainly mobile, but not often transportable.