strong point


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strong point

[′strȯŋ ‚pȯint]
(ordnance)
A strongly fortified and heavily armed point in a defense system, usually supported by auxiliary armed positions.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, the range index of a strong point target at the azimuth time i is given as
Despite many strong points, Marathon Medicine does occasionally suffer from the fact that some presenters simply did not measure up to others on the program.
* In place of rigid bureaucracies, make individual schools and principals the "strong point in the food chain."
Second, its strong point is not political philosophy, since it discounts "the common good" as the moral determinant of political decision-making.
They have made a very strong point of stressing fair play and have supported the 'kick racism out of sport campaign' so they must do something.
Engines are a strong point, and they range from a 1.6-litre to the impressive 2.5 V6.
Continued adherence should ensure that housekeeping will be a strong point in future surveys.
But, judging by the experience of Mrs Jacqueline Gardiner, paperwork is not the health service's strong point.
Officials apparently believe that the airline's services are more complementary than those of rival Japan Airlines and that the airline's strong point would be its link with Vietnam Airlines to service Hanoi with Tokyo through Hong Kong.
A depression in the inflated tire sidewall is the result of a local "strong point" in the sidewall generally caused by an excessive fabric body ply splice.
Sitting still, reading a book, was not my strong point.
A strong point of the company, which, Fredmann said in a recent Dance Magazine feature, must take educating the public as a principal goal, is that it so clearly suggests the joy of dancing.